Policies

Abuse Reporting Policy

Statement of Purpose

The safety and wellbeing of students that attend HCOS is paramount. It is the responsibility of teaching and support staff to report to the Ministry of Children and Family Development as well as the Academic Head of School if they discover or suspect that a student may be neglected or abused either sexually, physically or emotionally.

Please refer to the Student At Risk Team for guidelines on how to follow up with school supports.  HCOS is committed to working together with Ministry of Children and Family Development or Delegated Aboriginal Child and Family Service Agencies and Police for the safety of all children enrolled at HCOS.

Guiding Principles

Every teacher or service provider with HCOS has a duty to report abuse or neglect or suspected abuse or neglect. Anyone who has reason to believe that a child has been or is likely to be abused or neglected has a legal duty under the Child, Family and Community Service Act to report the matter.

If a staff members thinks a child or youth under 19 years of age is being abused or neglected, they have the legal duty to report their concern to a child welfare worker. Phone 1-800-663-9122 at any time of the day or night.

If a child is in immediate danger, call police (call 911 or your local police) to intervene and a child protection social worker should be contacted to determine whether the child is in need of protection. Report this instance to the student at risk team (SRT).

Duty to Report Abuse or Suspected Abuse

The Child, Family and Community Service Act (CFCSA) requires that anyone who has reason to believe that a child or youth has been or is likely to be abused or neglected, and that the parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child or youth, must report the suspected abuse or neglect to a child welfare worker.

If You are a Community Service Provider

As a Service Provider, you have a key role to play in helping to keep children and youth safe.

How To Report

To make a report, please call 1-800-663-9122 any time of the day or night. The person who answers will make sure your concerns are directed to the right place.

What To Report

When making a report to a child welfare worker, it is helpful to include personal information, like your name, your phone number and your relationship to the child or youth. An anonymous call can also be placed if preferred. The child welfare worker will want to know:

Not all of this information is needed to make a report, just let the welfare worker know all the information that is known at this time. Remember that time is of the essence in responding, so if there is any concern, do not delay.

After A Report

Reports of suspected child abuse and neglect are assessed on a case by case basis and, depending on the circumstances, will warrant different types of responses. Child welfare workers choose the response that is least disruptive to the child or youth, and will keep the child or youth safe.

If the level of concern is high enough to involved MCFD teachers should also ensure that a Student at Risk Team form has been filled out so that school leadership can provide adequate and ongoing support for the situation. If the teacher would rather only inform the Academic Head of School, that is an option within the form.

After the assessment process is complete, if the child or youth is not at immediate risk of harm, the child welfare worker may:

Training and Review

Each HCOS teacher and support worker needs to read and become familiar with the Reporting Abuse Policy and will review this policy annually.

Each teacher and support worker should read and become familiar with, The Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect For Service Providers (PDF).

Academic Integrity Policy

The policies below are posted in the course online course orientation that students must take, as well as on course websites as they apply to each course:

General Exam Security Policies and Procedures
 Supervised Proctored Exams
 Zoom/Skype Verification
Test Design
Test Policy
Assignment Design
Knowledge Verification Tutorials
Member Checking
Course Design

 

 

 

Acceleration and Retention Policy

HCOS Acceleration and Retention Policy

Acceleration Policy

"Acceleration is the practice of placing students at a higher than normal level of instruction to meet their learning needs. It occurs when a teacher provides the student with advanced curriculum, when a student skips a grade, or when a student takes a specific course at a higher level.

Students can be accelerated by grade, when they are advanced in all areas, or by subject. In the latter case a student in Grade 6 may be doing math at an advanced level and language arts at his age level.
The BC Ministry of Education’s policy on Acceleration is that 'while many educators resist acceleration as a strategy, research overwhelmingly supports it. Acceleration has been shown to be positive for both achieving and underachieving gifted learners in the majority of documented cases." (Benbow & Stanley, 1983; Kulik & Kulik, 1992 qtd. in Gifted Education.pdf p. 14).

HCOS supports acceleration as a strategy in the support of gifted students.

Research on Promotion vs. Retention

The B.C. Ministry of Education's March, 2009 document entitled "Reporting Student Progress: Policy and Practice" states:

"Research generally supports promotion with intervention over retention. The following is a synopsis of research on promotion and retention.

Additionally, students who are retained, but not designated or put on an Individual Education Plan (IEP), may not have the additional "grade 13" year to complete Grad (Grades 10-12) requirements. This additional year can enable struggling students to slow their course load and gain the additional support they need in what is presumably the most challenging part of their K-12 education. 

Retention Policy

HCOS prefers promotion with learning supports over retaining students. Learning supports should be managed in collaboration with the Learning Services (LS) department; Regional Administrators (RAs) and Grad Advisors (GAs) should identify at-risk students and funnel them toward Learning Services (LS).

Students cannot be retained without approval from the Academic Head of School.

Exceptions

In recognition that December 31st is an arbitrary line that divides one grade from another and that philosophically, parents may wish their "young for their age" student to be held back or their "bright for their age" student to be accelerated, the following exceptions can be made to the above policy. 

When re-enrolling, Encom allows parents to select the next higher grade for their child. Only Office Admin have permission to select an alternate grade when acceleration or retention has been approved. Parents should re-enrol the student in their next grade and the office will make the change upon Academic Head of School approval.

Process of Approval for Acceleration or Retention

Full-Year Acceleration or Retention

Teachers who identify students who would benefit from this strategy should:

Step 1: Consultation: teachers speak with their Learning Services Consultant. Online assessments, discussion with parents, teachers, and regional admin may be part of the process of deciding and using a full-year acceleration or retention strategy.

Step 2: Forms and Approvals: Acceleration and Retention form is filled out by the teacher or LS Consultant. All final full-year acceleration decisions are made by the Academic Head of School and will be noted as a pinned log entry in the student’s Communications & Notes in Encom.

Course Acceleration or Retention

Working Ahead: In grades K-9, students who are "working ahead" and are meeting grade level competencies at a quicker rate may be moved ahead as they finish their current course work, with approval from their teacher.

Skipping Grades K-9: Acceleration by “skipping" a course or two in a year must have the support of the current teacher, approval of the new course teacher (if different from the current teacher) and approval of the Regional Administrator (RA). It is similar to a course challenge in Grad and should be based upon the student’s demonstrated ability in that subject area. Online assessment may be required. The RA should note approval in a pinned log entry in the student’s Communications & Notes in their Encom profile.

Course Challenge: Grades 10 - 12: In Grad, courses may not be skipped, they must submit to a course challenge process.

Administration Performance Evaluation Policy

Heads of School, Divisional Directors and Regional Administrators will be evaluated as they near the end of their first year of employment with Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). This evaluation will be comprised of two parts: Administrator’s Self-Evaluation and Supervisor's Evaluation. The two components will be summarized by the Supervisor and will be presented face-to-face with the Administrator.

A written summary will be submitted to be signed by both the Administrator and the Supervisor. The Administrator will keep one copy. A second copy will be placed in their HR file. Administrators will be evaluated annually.

Administrators may be evaluated at the Supervisor's discretion. If concerns arise regarding their performance, the individual will be informed in writing that they will be evaluated sooner than scheduled.

 

Anaphylaxis Policy

Anaphylaxis is:  is a severe allergic reaction that can be fatal, resulting in circulatory collapse or shock. The allergy may be related to food, insect stings, medicine, latex, nuts, etc.  The purpose of the policy is to provide an outline for prevention and care for a student with a known anaphylactic response.

Anaphylaxis Policy

Upon student application, if medical alert- life threatening or severe medical condition- is noted, Parent is asked to complete an LG Medical Planning Form. This form is  also located at the bottom of the Documents/forms/links page in SOPHIE under the title "Student Success and Safety". 

For Parent Accompanied Events:  Expectation of Parent to assume parental responsibility, carry the epi-pen and administer if needed. 

For drop off events: 

 

Note: The purchase of a CC wide epi-pen is encouraged at all locations, in the event that an anaphylactic response occurs in a student, not previously identified. 

Client-in-Litigation Policy

Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) will maintain a position of neutrality when working with families/students going through custodial or personally related litigation (i.e., injury, social services, etc.). Only if subpoenaed should HCOS employees/contractors participate in any litigation proceedings. In the event a subpoena is served, HCOS administration must be notified as soon as possible.

Relationship with the Guardians
  1. HCOS employees and contractors are first and foremost representatives of KCCS, with personal relationships being secondary in nature.
  2. HCOS teachers are first obligated to conduct relationships as directed by the BC Teacher Regulation Branch. Second, they are to maintain professional relationships that represent KCCS, and lastly, regard is given to personal relationships.
    • Teacher-contractor and parent/guardian relationships must be professional in nature with established boundaries in place. If needed, restate professional boundaries such as office hours, modes of contact, and permissible topics of discussion.
    • Personal teacher/parent relationships (friendship or otherwise) risk the potential for a conflict-of-interest situation and should be disclosed to a regional administrator.
  3. Should a situation arise wherein a parent/guardian requests legal or character support, written or verbal, a teacher/employee must decline and notify regional administration of the request. Examples may include requests to sign affidavits, writing letters, or agreeing to testify on behalf of a guardian.
Programming Decisions and Implementation
  1. HCOS employees/contractors will abide to terms laid out in the most current or relevant legal documents with regards to education.
  2. In the absence of a court order/separation agreement, maintain the “status quo” with regards to how the educational program was established at the time of separation.
    • If one parent was the primary home educator (made decisions around curriculum, programming, services in the home, etc.), that practice is to continue until a court order/agreement is in place
    • If mutual parental decisions were made around education, the process is to continue until a court order/agreement is in place
    • No changes are to be made to programming or implementation without written consent from both guardians
Communication and Reporting
  1. As deemed necessary, HCOS administration will participate in legal discussions. Teachers are not to communicate with lawyers without administrative permission.
  2. School wide communications, report cards, Student Learning Plans (SLPs), and Individual Education Plan (IEPs):
    • Both guardians are entitled to this information, unless a legal document, such as a restraining order/court order, states otherwise.
    • If necessary, secondary guardian profiles can be set up in Encom (contact main office for details). This will allow both guardians to receive mass mailouts.
  3. Teacher to mass family communications (e-mails, newsletters):
    • Add secondary guardian email to your family contact list.
  4. Teacher to individual guardian communications
    • Include both guardians when the content is an FYI about their child’s accomplishments, etc.
    • Communicate with parents individually in relation to the programming element each is responsible for.
 Face-to-Face Meetings, Home Visits, IEP meetings, Zoom, Skype
  1. Always follow terms of court order or separation agreement first.
  2. If guardians have a good working relationship with one another, both parents may be present for meetings.
  3. If guardians do not have a good working relationship, but court order allows for meetings with both, meet with guardians separately.
  4. Without a court order or separation agreement, maintain the status quo (i.e., programming, primary contact, etc.) as established prior to the time of separation.
  5. Uncertainty regarding the working relationship of the guardians should be approached with caution. Maintain a neutral stance.
    • Err on the side of safety. Arrange to have administration or a colleague attend with you or do not arrange joint meetings. Leave if neutrality cannot be maintained.
  6. If at any time, a meeting or conversation becomes emotionally or verbally abusive, graciously terminate it and use an alternative form of communication, such as email.
Overseeing an Education Assistant in the Home
  1. Education Assistants (EA’s) receive educational direction from the Special Education Teacher first and foremost. The parent can only direct in matters of daily logistics and scheduling.
  2. All of the direction given above also applies to EA’s contracted through HCOS.
Document Release & Requests from Lawyers/Guardians
  1. HCOS documentation and records of any kind (including report cards, etc.) will only be released from HCOS to a lawyer by court order.
  2. Access to elements of the Student Record (as defined by the Students Record Order) will only be made available to the guardians upon written consent from both guardians. If mutual consent is not available, a court order will be required to release documents from the Student Record.

Communication Policy

Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) will make every effort to meet the following protocols in
their communication to parents and students as well as between other HCOS teachers, staff and
administration:

Communicate in a positive, polite and supportive manner, always keeping in mind the Christian
nature of our school, its teachers, staff and families.

  1. In cases where the communication may reflect frustration or conflict then the HCOS
    teacher or staff are advised to include their administration in the communication.
  2. This does not preclude communication that may be corrective in nature as a teacher often
    needs to correct a student. It does mean that such communication will be done
    respectfully and with positive reinforcement.

The school’s preference for communication is first email, then phone.

  1. It should be noted that this is a preference only. If at any time a parent or student cannot
    make contact via email for technological reasons or for the necessity of clarity that comes
    with direct voice-to-voice communication, the HCOS teacher or staff will indicate an
    appropriate time to speak on the telephone. If the teacher or staff cannot be reached
    directly then contact will be arranged through the HCOS office.
  2. All HCOS teachers and staff are responsible to manage their email in an organized
    fashion within their email program.
  3. All HCOS teachers and staff will confine their email communication to their
    onlineschool.ca email address and not use private email addresses for school business. If
    confidentiality is an issue then the preferred mode of communication should be made
    through phone contact, not email.

A one to two day turn around in all communication is expected, with the exception of weekends
and holidays where the time line will extend.

  1. All teachers, staff and administration must check their email daily with exception of weekends and holidays.
  2. All teachers, staff and administration are expected to make timely responses during
    standard business hours.
  3. HCOS teachers, staff, parents and students should avoid the use of urgent markers in
    email (Importance: High!) unless the issue is truly urgent or time sensitive.
  4. A returned message does not mean that the issue is necessarily resolved within the
    timeline; it only means that communication has been returned. In the cases of marking
    papers, sending materials, and resolving tech support, the communication will try to
    specify projected time lines for resolution.

In the case of extended time away from school responsibilities for travel, conferences, or health
issues the teacher or staff person will communicate to both the HCOS administration first for
authorization and then their families and students.

  1. It is understood that in the case of emergencies grace will be extended to teachers and
    staff and administration will notify families of a plan for communication.

In the case where communication is not being followed through in a timely manner as outlined in
the previous points the parent or student should notify the HCOS office that they have not had a
timely communication from their teacher.

  1. Initially this contact should be for the purposes of re-establishing communication and
    resolving the particular communication need.
  2. If the communication issue is not resolved satisfactorily then school leadership should
    be contacted.

The online courses have forums associated with each class. These are monitored by the teacher
and the same rules apply to these forums as per an email.

  1. Teachers and staff should set up each forum so that they receive email notification when
    a student makes a post.
  2. Teachers are responsible to check their students’ contributions to the forum and ensure
    that they meet the appropriate communication standards as outlined at the beginning of
    this document.

Chat-room/forum protocols should also fit within the guidelines stated at the beginning of this
document. The teacher is responsible to monitor communication within their group discussion.

  1. Online class teachers will communicate via Zoom/Skype with their students during posted
    office hours to answer questions and give instruction or special help.
  2. If the teacher can’t make the posted office hours, they will communicate to the class when
    the rescheduled time will be. They will also post any news items within their course menu.

Conflict Resolution and Appeal Policy

At Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) we have five different people groups involved in the process of providing education:

Student to Student

When two students cannot resolve a conflict that is school related or school based then it is their responsibility to go to their teacher or supervising authority to find a resolution.

Student to Teacher or Teacher to Student

When a student or teacher cannot resolve a conflict then it is the student's or teacher's role to involve the parents in the resolution of the conflict.

Parent to Teacher or Teacher to Parent

When a conflict cannot be resolved between the parent and the teacher either the parent or the teacher should bring the issue to the regional administrator or grad director.

Parent to Administration or Administration to Parent

When a conflict cannot be resolved by a parent to administration or vise-a-versa then school leadership can be appealed to, first in writing then via phone conversation. Parents and Guardians are encouraged to use the following process for dealing with individual issues or concerns: 

Step One:  The issue must be dealt with first by the persons directly involved.  It is essential that meaningful communication is established right from the beginning.  Both parties must clearly identify the issues being discussed. There must be an open discussion and an honest attempt to settle the issue at this level, keeping in mind the understanding that policies must be followed.

Step Two:  If the issues cannot be resolved through open discussion, the matter should be brought to the attention of the Divisional Director. 

Step Three:  If Step Two does not result in a resolution, the Divisional Director will refer the matter to the Academic Head of School at the parents/guardians request. The Head of School will review the issue and then contact the parent(s)/guardian(s) to discuss the issue in order to work towards a resolution.

Step Four:  If the matter remains unresolved after the prior step, the matter may be appealed to the School Board. The appeal must be submitted in writing, in care of the school, within no more than five days after communication with the Head of School.

Step Five: In extreme situations, the decision of the Board may be appealed to the School’s Association, Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) Ombudsperson.

All communication should be done with care and sensitivity to the community we represent.

Conflicts Outside of These Parameters

Occasionally any one of the five people groups will have concerns on a broader scope concerning the school:

Broader issues regarding policy and school procedures need to be addressed with the school leadership, first the divisional director or grad director and the Heads of School, then to the society board.

Personal issues with those in authority need to be addressed first with them and then with their immediate supervisor.

Steps to Conflict Resolution
  1. When you are wronged by someone else then it is your responsibility to go directly to that person and speak to them personally. Things to remember:
    • Be careful to try and hear their side of the story. Many times, the situation is only a misunderstanding. There are always two sides to every conflict.
    • As much as possible deal with facts and not feelings. Try to set aside your own hurt enough to inquire and communicate about the actual facts.
  2. After you have communicated one-on-one with the individual whom your concern is with and if you are not satisfied with the response, then we can bring someone else into the situation.
    • The purpose of the other person is to help with objectivity not to gang up on the one whom we are trying to address.
    • Let the other person mediate in the conversation – be willing to change your own position based upon their input.
    • Often it is helpful to bring someone in when you are still emotionally troubled over the issue in order to help you both communicate and listen to the other side.
  3. If the individual in question still does not listen to you and the other person then you may take it to the next level of authority. Generally, the next level of authority will be able to help resolve the issue in conflict.
    • If satisfaction is not found with the next level of authority then the issue needs to go up the ladder to the next level of authority.
    • Often the next level of authority may disagree or have a different perspective on the issue under examination.
    • If the authorities responsible disagree or don't see the issue in the same light as you then you need to reassess the issue or reassess your relationship with the organization or authority structure.

Throughout the entire process the underlying motives must be to seek the truth and to bring resolution, forgiveness and restitution. 

Course Activation Policy and Procedure

The Course Activation Procedure also ensures:

The Funding Level of the Student is determined by the Activation Date in the following circumstances:

Activation Procedure: This procedure determines if an enrolled student will be eligible for funding and teacher remuneration. For K-9 the level of funding is also determined by when the activation is dated. (See the above points on Funding Levels).

In the case of Dual Credit courses such as AP or Humanities, each specific course must have its own activation process. If the courses start simultaneously then documents pertinent to the course being activated must be submitted. The documents in the second course must be completely different assignments from those activated in the first course.

Course Challenge and Equivalency Policy

Course Challenge Policy

To challenge a course is to prove the student has undocumented prior learning. Students are entitled to challenge in order to receive credit for Ministry Authorized or Board Authority Authorized Grade 10, 11 or 12 courses.

Prior to engaging in the challenge process, schools must review any documentation of prior learning that a student presents in order to determine if credit can be awarded through equivalency.

A student can challenge a course if he or she:

Challenge Process

The challenge process begins when it is determined that credit cannot be awarded through equivalency and a student has given compelling evidence that he or she will succeed in a challenge assessment.

To receive credit for a course that does not have a required exam, a student must:

To receive credit for a course that has a required exam, a student must:

Equivalency Policy

Courses taught outside the British Columbia school system that substantially match the curricular competencies of Ministry Authorized or Board Authority Authorized Grade 10, 11 or 12 courses are eligible for credit through equivalency. For example, a student who completes a course in Alberta may receive credit for a comparable course in British Columbia through equivalency.

HCOS will award credit through equivalency following the procedures:

For the purpose of determining equivalency, comparison of courses may be based on factors such as the following:

  • comparison of learning standards
  • comparison of general subject matter 
  • comparison of depth or breadth of coverage of subject matter 
  • comparison of assessment methods, instruments, and standards. 

To be deemed equivalent, sufficient content should have been covered to enable the student to be successful in further learning in the content area. For a Grade 11 or 12 course, there should be a match of approximately 80 percent or more of learning standards.

In order to receive credits through equivalency, students must provide the appropriate documentation as proof of successful completion of the course.

For reporting and transcript purposes, HCOS will assign a letter grade and percentage to all credits awarded through equivalency. If the student's documents show only a letter grade or level, HCOS may choose to assign a percentage, based on the mid-point of the matching British Columbia letter grade range. HCOS may use "Transfer Standing" (TS) if it is not possible to determine a letter grade and a percentage from the documentation.

 

Course Withdrawal Policy

At HCOS we strive to offer flexible course solutions for our students. We recognize that students and parents/families change their mind regarding courses after enrolling, even when a significant portion of the course work has been completed.

Student Requested Withdrawal

Students can make a request to be withdrawn from a course using the Course Withdrawal and Change Form. This request will be forwarded to the course teacher for consultation and confirmation.

In the case where students have completed more than 80 percent of the course as determined by the teacher, students will not be permitted to withdraw. 

Students will be given the opportunity in those cases to either:

The BC Ministry of Education’s reporting order states:

W = (Withdrawal) According to the policy of the board, and upon request of the parent of the student or, when appropriate, the student, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may grant permission to a student to withdraw from a course or subject. 

Please note that if you withdraw from a course you will be unable to retake the course until two funding periods have passed. You can check with your Grad Advisor on when that might be.  

HCOS Administration will grant permission in extenuating circumstances (i.e. extreme illness, sudden change in life situation, etc.) for a student to withdraw if they have completed more than 80%. 

Teacher or Grad Advisor Requested Withdrawal

Teachers or Grad Advisors can make a request for a student to be withdrawn from a course using the Course Withdrawal and Change Form

Teachers may request a withdrawal from a course when:

Please note, that the withdrawal policy (not being able to start a course again for a minimum of 2 funding periods) applies in these situations as well. As such, if a student reaches out afterwards and wishes to complete the remainder of the course, administration will reach out to the teacher to confirm re-opening the student’s course.

Curriculum Funds Policy

Curriculum funds are made available to K-9 students based on enrollment for a full school year. Students who leave early will have that amount prorated based on the percentage of the school year that they have been with Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). For example, a student who has been with us for only two months would receive 20% funding. Early transfer out of the school may result in your family being invoiced for overages.

Grade 10-12 Individualized courses receive an advance to purchase curriculum. If the course does not receive an active date (7%-10% of work completed) by April 30th, then any advance funds spent are required to be repaid to HCOS.

Drinking Water Policy

As a Distributed Learning (DL) Independent School, our students are located in their homes; as such, the Heritage Christian Online School HCOS drinking water policy is not applicable to these learning environments. In regards to the main office facility, they are compliant with water testing requirements as per the Drinking Water Protection Act and the Public Health Act.

Where external rental facilities are used for face to face learning, students are required to bring potable water to the site.

Families can review the regulations that govern the protection and access safe drinking water in British Columbia here:

 

Dual Credit Policy

HCOS students are permitted to take dual credit courses from approved post-secondary institutions

Policy Statement

Students may earn credits toward graduation in a variety of ways. In addition to earning credits by successfully completing courses delivered by a B.C. public or independent school, students will be awarded credits through this policy for dual credit courses. 

Rationale

Learning is a life-long activity. Students learn in a variety of ways, some of which take place outside of British Columbia or outside of the regular secondary school program. Schools will grant credit towards graduation for learning that has been assessed and matches or exceeds provincial, national or international standards.

Policy in full

This policy describes how HCOS awards credit to students who have successfully completed an equivalent Grade 10, 11 or 12 course from an educational jurisdiction or institution outside the B.C. school system.

HCOS will award credit based on equivalency for Grades 10, 11 and 12 Ministry-developed courses (including courses with a Graduation Program Exam) and Board Authorized courses. There is no limit to the number of credits students may be awarded through equivalency.

Credit from Post-Secondary Courses Policy

This policy describes how students earn credit towards graduation by earning credit for courses at specific Post Secondary Institutions. Equivalency credit will be awarded based on HCOS Course Challenge and Equivalency Policy.

Students are entitled to earn "dual credit" if they earn credit that leads to a post-secondary credential from a post-secondary institution which is a member of the British Columbia Transfer System or offered in French through Educacentre.

Post-secondary courses for which credit may be earned must be documented as follows:

Applicable post-secondary level courses count towards the required number of Grade 12 level credits needed to satisfy graduation requirements.

Procedures for Earning Dual Credit

All post-secondary level courses will be reported using course codes listed in the online Course Registry.

For reporting and transcript purposes, HCOS will assign all credits earned at a post-secondary institution a letter grade and percentage. Provided a course consists of the standard number of hours for most courses offered at that post-secondary institution, such courses will be awarded four credits, regardless of the number of credits indicated on the post-secondary institution's transcript. However, if the course at the post-secondary institution is offered in modules, credits awarded should be proportionate to 4 credits for the whole course.

Adult Basic Education (ABE) courses do not count for dual credit. For information on how to report these for credit toward graduation, see the online Course Registry.

Education Resource Policy

This policy sets out the procedures that determine how learning resources are chosen, as well as how concerns or challenges will be addressed by Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS).  

Definition of Learning Resources

Learning Resources are texts, videos, software, and instructional materials that teachers use to assist students to meet the expectations for learning defined by provincial and local curricula.

This policy is specific to learning resources which form the core program collection of resources.

Learning resources used in the classroom will be evaluated and approved by HCOS with consideration given to curriculum fit, pedagogy, social considerations, age and developmental appropriateness, as well as the school authority’s philosophical, cultural and/or religious values.

Learning Resources Approval Process

Heritage Christian Online School will encourage teachers to utilize education media that have been evaluated before being used with students. The evaluation process involves a minimum of two school authority representatives, one of whom is a practicing teacher with at least three years’ experience, preferably in grade level and subject area for which the resources are to be used. The recommended scope of professional learning resources for review include Primary (Gr K-3), Intermediate (Gr 4-6), Middle (Gr 7-9) and Secondary (Gr 10-12).

The evaluation criteria used in determining appropriate learning resources for the school will include, but are not limited to:

Resource evaluation will be based on one or more of the following inclusion criteria:

Authority Approval

The Academic Head of School and appropriate Divisional Director will approve resources used by HCOS which then become recommended resources for a five-year period unless they are withdrawn. The authority may continue to use the learning resources after five years if the authority grants an extension of an additional five-year period. If a resource is potentially controversial then it will be brought forward for Board of Directors approval.

Withdrawal of a Recommended Learning Resource

Learning Resources will maintain a recommended status for five years, after which continued status will be subject to, but not limited to, criteria such as curriculum relevance, currency, and availability.

The recommendation of withdrawal will be made by a committee of at least two representatives of HCOS, one being a practicing teacher with at least three year’s experience preferably in grade level and subject area for which the resources are used. The recommended scope of professional learning resources review will be Primary (Gr K-3), Intermediate (Gr 4-6), Middle (Gr 7-9) and Secondary (Gr 10-12).

A learning resources withdrawal will be confirmed by a motion passed by the HCOS Board of Directors.

Challenge to the Use of Authority Recommended Learning Resources

Challenges to the use of authority recommended learning resources must be made in writing to the (principal/head of school), identifying the learning resource and stating the reason why the resource(s) may not be suitable. Challenges will only be accepted from individuals in the school community whose children are directly engaged with the learning resource(s), educators who use the resource(s) or Ministry of Education staff.

Within 14 days of written receipt of a learning resource challenge, the Academic Head of Schoo will convene a meeting of a committee, consisting of a minimum of three representatives of HCOS, one of whom must be an administrator and another a practicing teacher. The practicing teacher must have at least three years of experience in the grade level(s) and subject area(s) for which the resource is used.

Based on the committee’s recommendation, the authority may dismiss the challenge, raise the awareness of the implications of using the resource with the teaching staff, communicate with the publisher and/or withdraw the recommended resource from further use in the school.

The individual issuing the challenge will be notified of the committee’s decision in writing within 14 days of the decision.

Sources of Learning Resources

HCOS may use the services of the Education Resource Acquisition Consortium (ERAC) to assist them in choosing or approving learning resources.

Approved by the HCOS Board of Directors, April, 2017

Choosing Resources Within the Learning Commons

The role of the Learning Commons is to provide digital and non-digital resources from multiple perspectives to address the competencies and content laid out in the BC Ed Plan by the Ministry of Education. In choosing resources consideration is given to equip our students to become compassionate, collaborative, creative, and inquisitive , while understanding personal and social responsibilities. Purchased resources include a wide variety of worldviews.  With due diligence, Learning Commons staff review all resources that reflect content which covers both the BCEdplan and Christian education.

Learning Commons resources are reviewed and purchased by the curriculum team. The curriculum team consists of a teacher librarian and curriculum consultant. Subject specialists are contacted as needed. Input is sought from our curriculum writers as well.   

Complaint Process

Concerns regarding Learning Commons resources are forwarded to the Chair of the Learning Commons Committee who will respond to each inquiry.  Should there be further action needed, Schedule E will be followed.

For more information please see the Conflict Resolution and Appeal Policy

Electronic Supervision Policy

For the protection of Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS), our staff, our teachers, our parents and our students we have the following safeguards in place:

We do not have access to personal email. Electronic communication that occurs outside of our HCOS servers is not accessible to us and we are unable to monitor those communications.

Emergency Drills Policy

At Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) we encourage our families to educate themselves on fire, earthquake and lock down procedures. 

Earthquake Safety

Resources

There are many great resources online on how your family can prepare for an emergency. Here are just a few useful sites related to making an emergency plan: 

ShakeOut BC Resources
Video: Making a Family Emergency Plan
BC Hydro 72 Hour Emergency Kit Tips
BC Government Prepare Your Home Tips 

Home Fire Safety

Equipping your home with fire safety equipment is your first line of defense if a fire should occur in your home. Fire equipment includes equipment to both warn you in the event of a fire and helps you extinguish a fire. These include the following:

  1. Smoke alarms
  2. Fire extinguishers
  3. Carbon monoxide alarm
  4. Home fire sprinklers

Fire can spread rapidly in your home, leaving you as little as two minutes to escape. Therefore, planning and practicing your family escape plan can save lives.

  1. Draw a home escape plan and discuss it with everyone in your home.
  2. Twice a year, practice the plan during the nighttime and daytime with everyone in your home.
  3. Know at least two ways out of every room and make sure that all doors and windows leading outside open easily.

Home education often takes place outside of the home. When attending a learning event, it is important to be prepared as a family for the unlikely event of a fire. Communicate with your family to determine an emergency meeting spot located near the venue.

Students should not only know where this agreed emergency spot is, but should also be familiar with the route to the spot. In addition, at each field trip location it is important to point out the exit routes to the students. 

Resources

There are many great resources online on how your family can prepare for an emergency. Here are just a few:

Canadian Red Cross: Planning for and dealing with house fires
National Fire Protection Association
Resources for kids: Sparky the Fire Dog
Office of the Fire Commissioner Links

Lockdown Procedures/ Drills

Student and teacher preparedness in case of an emergency. Reminder to:

  1. Front load information to all involved prior to a drill to help prepare and keep everyone calm.
  2. Restrict all student cell phone use to keep communication lines clear between you, teachers, admin/ directors as
    necessary. Important for students to not to utilize their cell phones for calls or for text messaging, and to put their personal phones to “silent mode” during a lockdown drill or situation.

Drill Type and Frequency:

 Hold and Secure (Code Yellow) Drills

  1. Announce “This is a Code Yellow Lockdown” and repeat 3 times.
  2. All students stay or go into their classroom.
  3. Regular classroom activity continues.
  4. Coordinator ensures all exterior doors are locked.
  5. Supervision at all entrances may be heightened.
  6. Classroom teachers close windows and blinds, lock the door, take and submit attendance, also recording any additional persons in the room.
  7. Students can do quiet seatwork, ensuring that all announcements can be heard. Do not open doors (no bathroom/water fountain breaks).
  8. Students are escorted to parent for pickup at days’ end if area threat still present.
  9. Announce ‘Code Green - all clear” three times when threat has been resolved.

Full Lock Down

Full lockdown is signified by five short bells in succession. Teachers must immediately:

  1. Assemble students into classrooms
  2. Close and lock doors and windows and turn off lights
  3. Have students sit silently out of sight lines
  4. Take attendance. Call the office to report all present or in the case of a missing child.
  5. Wait for further instructions or information by intercom.
  6. Do not exit classrooms or make washrooms trips until directed to by principal or acting principal.

External Credits Policy

This policy describes how students earn credit towards graduation through external credentials approved by the Ministry.

External Credits refer to Ministry-approved documented prior learning.  An official list of External Credits approved by the Ministry is provided to schools on an annual basis in which some external credentials are classified as required courses and others as elective courses.  

External credits cannot be granted for courses required for graduation.  

Grade 12-level external credentials count towards the required number of Grade 12 level credits needed to satisfy graduation requirements.

There is no limit to the number of credits a student may earn by using the external credentials. However, there may be credit restrictions between credentials where the external courses or programs are deemed to be equivalent.

In order to receive external credits the following procedure must be followed:

  1. The student must take responsibility to communicate the proof of credential and appropriate documentation (certificate etc) to their Grad Advisor for the course they wish to receive external credit for.
  2. If the certificate requires verification, the Grad Advisor will contact the external organization for that verification.
  3. All courses will be assigned a mark of TS (Transfer Standing) if a letter grade or percentage is not determined based on the documentation.

Although external credentials may contribute towards graduation requirements, they may or may not meet general or specific admissions requirements for post-secondary institutions. It is students’ responsibility to verify admissions requirements for the post-secondary institutions they plan to attend.

Students may have earned an approved external credential prior to entering Grade 10. If so, they are awarded credit if they present their credential any time after they enter Grade 10.

For more information about students earning credits through Challenge, Equivalency and External Credentials please refer to the information in the Ministry of Education website.

Credit from Post-Secondary Courses

This policy describes how students earn credit towards graduation by earning credit for courses at specific Post Secondary Institutions.

Students are entitled to earn "dual credit" if they earn credit that leads to a post-secondary credential from a post-secondary institution which is a member of the British Columbia Transfer System or offered in French through Educacentre.

Post-secondary courses for which credit may be earned must be documented as follows:

Applicable post-secondary level courses count towards the required number of Grade 12 level credits needed to satisfy graduation requirements.

Grade Promotion and Benchmarks Policy

This is a statement of best practices employed by Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) regarding grade promotion in relation to checkpoints and benchmarks in grades three, six and nine. This policy is to provide guidance as to how HCOS can effectively address the requirements for addressing Ministry of Education prescribed curricular competencies for grades kindergarten through nine.

Grade Promotion/Retention

Promotion through the grades is determined through teacher summative and formative assessment together with consultation of parents, or guardians, regarding the child’s readiness. If retention is being considered, then Administration is included in the process. For more details please view the Acceleration and Retention Policy.

 Addressing Ministry Curricular Competencies - Benchmarks

The Ministry of Education has established grades three, six and nine benchmark years to help students stay on track. Kindergarten through grade three competencies should be completed by the end of grade three. Grades four through six competencies should be completed by the end of grade six. Grades seven through nine competencies should be completed by the end of grade nine.

Our Process

Teachers are responsible to track the curricular competencies that are covered by each student over the course of each school year. Encom provides a means to track competencies that have been covered.

At the start of the new school year the teacher is responsible to review their completion status to date using the Curricular Competencies Overview function on Encom. The teacher uses this information when completing the Student Learning Plan (SLP) for each student, ensuring that any missing competencies will be addressed in that school year. Parents also have access to this information at any time throughout the school year.

Particular attention is paid to students entering grades three, six, and nine. During the first and second reporting periods, the teacher is responsible to monitor the progress in moving towards completion of the curricular competencies. The teacher will make adjustments to the student’s studies as needed to target completion of the competencies by year end.

School Completion Policy

HCOS may recommend to the inspector that a student with special needs be awarded a School Completion Certificate if the student

  1. Has an IEP and,
  2.  Is enrolled in an educational program that is not designed to meet the graduation requirements set out in Ministerial Order M302/04, the Graduation Program Order, and the student
    meets the learning outcomes contained in the student’s IEP, if that IEP contains all the learning outcomes of the student’s educational program, or
  3. Has successfully completed the student’s educational program, if the student’s IEP does not contain all the learning outcomes of the student’s educational program.

If HCOS recommends to the inspector that a student with special needs be awarded a School Completion Certificate, the inspector must recommend to the Minister that a School Completion Certificate be awarded to the student.

HCOS Discrimination Protection Policy

The safety and wellbeing of children in our school is of paramount consideration.  Children deserve to be protected from abuse, neglect, bullying, harm or threat of harm.  Therefore, HCOS Staff & Teachers will ensure that children attending our school experience a Christian learning environment that enables every child to know they are special because they are created in the image of God, and should feel safe, accepted and respected.

HCOS is involved in ongoing work and training to ensure that students feel respected and connected with our community.  This includes protection of our students' physical safety, social connectedness, inclusiveness as well as protection from all forms of bullying, regardless of their gender, race, culture, religion, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity and expression, while remaining consistent with HCOS' faith-values, cultural perspectives and philosophical values.

There are many strategies and activities that can be employed within our school to enable students to feel safe, accepted and respected. The following suggestions are provided to facilitate a conversation on strengthening the learning environment for children.

 

Harassment and Bullying Prevention Policy

The safety and wellbeing of children at Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) is of paramount consideration. Children deserve to be protected from abuse, neglect, bullying, harm or threat of harm. Therefore, HCOS Staff and Teachers will ensure that children attending our school experience a Christian learning environment that enables every child to know they are special because they are created in the image of God, and should feel safe, accepted and respected.

HCOS is involved in ongoing work and training to ensure that students feel respected and connected with our community. This includes protection of our students’ physical safety, social connectedness, inclusiveness as well as protection from all forms of bullying, regardless of their gender, race, culture, religion, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity and expression, while remaining consistent with HCOS’ faith-values, cultural perspectives and philosophical values.

Behavior that does not respect the individuals’ honour and dignity will be immediately dealt with, upon consultation with administration, staff, teachers and parents.

Because we seek to foster a safe environment for all, HCOS will take all reasonable steps to prevent any and all retaliation by a person against a student who has made a complaint of a breach of this policy.

Resource: ERASE is a comprehensive prevention and intervention program that builds on effective progress already in place to ensure consistent policies and practices across all school districts backed by strong community partnerships.  Four different types of bullying are outlined: Physical, Social Emotional, Verbal, and Cyber.  In addition to providing resources for parents, students and educators, ERASE also provides an Online Reporting Tool for students or parents to report incidents of bullying.   For more information on ERASE, visit the Erase Bullying Website.

Cyber-Bullying and Bullying Prevention

Statement of Purpose

Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) is committed to foster, through example and guiding practices, an online and physical environment that works to keep students and staff safe from cyber-bullying and bullying. Reported incidents will be taken seriously and fully investigated. Any form of cyber-bullying or bullying will be confronted. Action to resolve bullying may result in suspension or deletion from HCOS social networking, blogging, or school community events.

Definition of Cyber-bullying and Bullying

Bullying is a relationship problem exerted from a position of power, where repeated physical, verbal or social aggression causes embarrassment, pain, or discomfort. Bullying acts may be intentional or unintentional and perpetrated by individuals or groups. Cyber-bullying applies to aggressive acts to belittle or defame an individual through repeated digital communications (e.g., social networking forums, emails, websites, blogs, webinar platforms, chat lines, etc.) Cyber-bullying and bullying may include threats, name-calling, insults, sexual harassment or racial slurs.

Physical bullying includes all of the above, with the addition of hitting, shoving, stealing, or damaging property when it is in a physical context. Bullying is not necessarily the case in every situation that may result in conflict. Student disagreements, speaking in a perceived aggressive tone, confronting someone's behaviour, misunderstandings, personality struggles are all examples of normal human interaction that isn't necessarily bullying when there is no evidence of controlling aggressive behaviour.

Student and Parent Guidelines
Teacher and Staff Guidelines
Administrator Guidelines
Resolving Action
Internet Safety & Literacy Tips for Parents

At HCOS our students are encouraged to become wise, digital learners who can search online within boundaries, ensuring Internet safety and healthy learning. With this in mind here are some useful rules for providing Godly education for your new online learner.

Guiding your Students Online

To ensure your students feel safe online please follow the suggested guidelines. Look into setting up the following bookmarks for their own special folder:

Preserving Privacy
Possible Hazards
Information on Cyber Safety

Independent Directed Studies Policy

Independent Directed Studies (IDS) Overview

Under teacher supervision, students can earn additional Independent Directed Study (IDS) credits by pursuing curriculum in more detail of a course they’re enrolled in or by focusing on the learning outcomes of a course that they’re not taking.

To participate in this method of learning, students must demonstrate the ability to work independently. Along with their teacher, they should also develop an Independent Directed Study plan that includes:

Students do not need to complete the approved classroom course curriculum before they pursue an Independent Directed Study in that course. However, an IDS must be based on the curricular competencies of a Ministry-Developed or Board/Authority Authorized Grade 10, 11 or 12 course.

IDS Policy

This policy enables students to initiate their own area of learning and to receive credit towards graduation. The policy also allows schools to recognize learning in a Ministry-developed or Board Authorized course that a student may not have completed. This policy is not a student entitlement but an enabling policy intended to encourage schools to allow students to pursue further studies of interest.

IDS credits may be awarded by boards to students who have successfully completed independent work based on a subset of learning outcomes of Grade 10, 11 or 12 Ministry developed courses or Board Authorized courses. A student may study one or more curricular competencies in depth, or study more broadly a wide variety of learning outcomes from a single course.

IDS credits may only be used to satisfy elective requirements.

The maximum value for a single IDS course is four credits, but there is no limit to the total number of IDS credits a student may earn. The number of credits a student earns for an IDS will be set out in the plan developed by that student and a teacher, and approved by a principal. Grade 12 IDS credits may count toward the minimum of 16 grade 12 credits required for graduation.

IDS Procedure:
  1. Student and teacher create a course plan that includes curricular competencies and overview.
  2. Teacher will complete the Independent Directed Studies (IDS) Form. It is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure that all requirements are met. 
    Independent Directed Studies (IDS) Form
    • Teacher will then send the form to administration for approval and course creation.
    • Administration will present the form to the Heads of School for approval.
    • Heads of School will approve, reject, or ask for revision of the IDS form.
      • If approved:
        • Heads of School will sign IDS form and give it back to administration.
        • Administration will create the IDS course and then send the approved form to teacher.
        • Teacher will upload the IDS form along with the proof of work assignment into Encom at the time of activation.
      • If rejected:
        • Administration will notify teacher of rejection along with the explanation of why approval was not granted.
        • Teacher can choose to modify course then resubmit form.
      • If asked to revise:
        • Administrator will explain areas that need revision.
        • Teacher will revise from and resubmit to administration.

    Learner Safety Policy & Student Supervision

    We recognize that our students occasionally will participate in learning activities outside of the home or campus setting. In order to protect our students at these various locations, including third-party locations we have the following safeguards in place.

    Criminal Record Checks

    Anyone who has contact with children regardless of age is required to have a Criminal Record Check (CRC) on file with Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). This includes anyone in a volunteer or supervisory role, and excludes relatives and family members working with their own children.

    Insurance

    HCOS Teachers and Service Providers exercise due diligence to help ensure the care and safety of all participants. HCOS Teachers and Service Providers are covered by third party liability insurance. A Certificate of Liability or Additional Assured is available to rental facilities upon request. 

    Third Party Providers

    Anyone acting as a third-party educational provider (private lessons) is required to have a CRC on record with the school. If it is an organization such as a dance studio, then a copy of their organization’s requirement of CRC s is required.

    Internet Safety

    We have an Internet Safety and Literacy document that we share with parents and students. We run webinars and sessions throughout the province on online safety.

    Risk Management
    Provision for Medical Issues at Learning Groups Events

    As noted in the Learner Safety and Supervision Policy, where students are in the care of HCOS representatives, the event application requests medical information for each participant. Where serious allergies (anaphylactic) or medical alerts are indicated, additional information is requested from the family. Parents are asked to complete and return a Medical Planning Form outlining student symptoms and care. Supplementary forms may be requested, depending on the nature of the medical concern, such as Permission to Administer Medicine, Diabetes Support Plan, Safety Plan etc. outlining further specifics depending on the needs of the student.

    Student information is provided to the event Coordinator. Student information includes pertinent information related to medical alerts, legal alerts and challenges in a group setting. All supporting documents and forms are provided together with emergency contact information.

    Communication Management of Emergencies on Field Trips

    As a school that operates across the province, Learning Groups Coordinators are our first line of communication if an incident/accident occurs at an LG event. Coordinators determine first response using Emergency Response and Medical Response Protocols, followed by communication with their LG Regional Admin, LG Director and HCOS Heads of School appropriately. Coordinators are to discuss and confirm with the LG RA, as part of their event planning process, how they will communicate pertinent details at the start of the event to all participants as well as reach out in the event of an emergency. Further planning considerations will be made for overnight, higher risk events, and those taking place in more remote locations, where regular communication channels may not be available.

    Further information, including additional Policies & Procedures for off-site activities, are detailed in the following documents:

    Emergency Response Protocol

    While developing a culture of Healthy Risk Management, should an incident occur, refer to the following response procedures to assess and respond accordingly to the nature of the situation. Please keep in regular communication with your LG Admin, particularly in the event of an emergency.

    Sample Threat Assessment Protocol (SD35) flowchart page 12

    Violent Risk Assessment (VTRA)

    Weapon or serious/ plausible threat? If yes, this is an imminent threat.

    Threats, threat related, or worrisome behaviour indicating potential harm to self or others (speech, action, assignments, etc)? Depending on the level of severity, if not an imminent threat please discuss with your LG RA to help assess and determine next steps.

    Scenario regarding an individual or on-site location:

    1. Immediately contact your Administrator who will then follow-up as needed. 
      1. This would include suicidal behaviour or self harm, violent threat toward student, staff or school, sexual assault, pornography.
      2. Threats can take the form of written assignments, art, spoken words, text messages, photos, or online social media postings.
    2. If a cell phone with a threat is confiscated, remove the SIM card, or immediately turn the phone to airplane mode. 
    3. Turn the phone into an administrator. Do not take screenshots or forward photos which could be considered pornographic material.
    4. Reminder to also complete an Incident Report and follow direction from Director.

    VTRA - Imminent Threat Protocol

    If immediate and/or imminent verbal threat and/or suspected danger to self or others:

    1. Call 911
    2. Adhere to the Lockdown procedures (Code Red) as outlined below
    3. Call Academic Head of School as soon as possible to alert them of the scenario
      HoS phone numbers:
      1. Sara Kraushar: 1-778-554-5515
      2. Craig Kwiatkowski: 1-250-859-2202
    4. LG phone numbers
      1. LG Director Christine Loewen: 250-571-2594
      2. LG RA phone number: __________________
    5.  Ensure all physically present are safe and calm
    6. Adhere to Police and HoS direction
    7. Return to class or dismiss students to parent/ guardian when all clear
    8. Complete an Incident Report and follow direction from Director.
    9. Send draft parent email notification to HoS and Director of LG for review/ approval
    10. Send parent email notification
    11. Follow-up as per Student at Risk Team: HoS, LG Director, Coordinator or Adult in Charge, Individualized/SE teacher, support person if applicable, etc
      applicable, etc.
    12. Continue developing culture of Healthy Risk Management

    Reminders:

    Stranger on the Premises

    Teacher or Supervising Adult:

    1. Do not compromise your own safety or the safety of students.
    2. Assess the situation as you approach, keeping your distance.

    If the stranger’s behaviour is NOT threatening:

    1. Ask if they need assistance.
    2. Direct the stranger to the appropriate supervisor, monitor or escort them accordingly.
    3. Notify the Coordinator or Adult in Charge immediately: Report the stranger’s location and description.

    If the stranger’s behaviour appears THREATENING but has not escalated to violence:

    1. Notify the Coordinator or Adult in Charge immediately
      1. Report the stranger’s location and description.
      2. Call 911 at your discretion.
    2. Keep a safe distance.
    3. Follow instructions from the appropriate supervisor.
    4. Adhere to the Not an Imminent Threat Protocol.

    If you see a violent/armed and dangerous stranger within the premises:

    1. Initiate a Full Lockdown (Code Red) and adhere to the lockdown procedures.
    2. Notify others immediately by whatever means available to you.
    3. Follow instructions from the local Authorities and Coordinator or Adult in Charge.
    4. Call 911 at your discretion, if it is safe to do so.
    5. Adhere to the Imminent Threat Protocol.

    Not an Imminent Threat

    If threat exists nearby, within the vicinity or community:

    1. Contact your local police liaison for further information/ advisement, information located on CC, Coop and extended LC locations grid spreadsheet . Refer to the appropriate column for specific contact numbers for your location.
          a) school liaison Name _______________ Ph# _____________
          b) local non-emergency as secondary Ph# ________________
    2. Adhere to the Hold and Secure procedures outlined below or continue as directed.

    Lockdown Types 

    1. Shelter-in-Place – Usually an external health hazard where building evacuations are not recommended.
    2. Internal Threat – This threat exists when the danger is inside of the school or campus. The goal of this procedure should be to keep everyone safe until the threat is completely removed.
    3. External Threat – This type of threat occurs outside of the school building or campus. The goal of this lockdown is to prevent the threat from entering the school or campus.
    4. Full Lockdown – This scenario involves a serious threat that requires immediate action.

    Lockdown Procedures

    Full Lockdown and Hold and Secure signals may vary according to location, all instructors and students should be aware of what the signal is and respond accordingly. 

    Reminders: 

    Student Protocol:

    Full Lockdown (Code Red)

    Definition: Used if an immediate, local physical threat to staff and students
    Examples: Intruder in the building, active shooter, hostage situation, or riots. 

     Coordinator or Adult in Charge calls 911. Teachers must immediately:

    1. Assemble all students in the vicinity into the closest secure location i.e. classroom, storage room, nearby shelter or building if out-of-doors. 
    2. Close and lock doors and windows, close blinds and turn off the lights. Do not open doors; do not exit rooms or make washroom trips until directed to by Coordinator, Adult in Charge or local authority. 
    3. Coordinator or Adult in Charge ensures all exterior doors are locked.
    4. Students need to go to corners of the room away from visible sight and shooting lines (unseen from windows or doors). If a windowless storage room or shelter is available, go in there. For those in the gym, go into the equipment storage room. 
    5. Stay silent and out of view; no seatwork can be done.
    6. Adult takes attendance. Call the Coordinator or Adult in Charge, or share information via method available such as text, zoom or WhatsApp group. 
    7. Coordinator or Adult in Charge to update pertinent information to adults on-site. 
    8. Coordinator or Adult in Charge should be in a secure location.
    9. Coordinator or Adult in Charge signals and announces ‘Code Green - all clear” three times when threat has been resolved (authorized only by an identified Police Officer). 
    10. Complete VTRA-Imminent Threat Protocol steps as per above.
    Hold and Secure (Code Yellow)  

    Definition: Used if there is a security or safety concern in the neighbourhood.
    Examples: Police Incident in the area or wild animal in the vicinity.

    1. Announce “This is a Code Yellow Lockdown” and repeat 3 times.
    2. All students stay or go into their classroom.
    3. Regular classroom activity continues
    4. Coordinator or Adult in Charge ensures all exterior doors are locked.
    5. Supervision at all entrances may be heightened
    6. Classroom teachers close windows and blinds, lock the door, take and submit attendance, also recording any additional persons in the room.
    7. Students can do quiet seatwork, ensuring that all announcements can be heard. Do not open doors (no bathroom/water fountain breaks).
    8. Do not leave the building until directed by administrators or police.
    9. Students are escorted to parent for pickup at days’ end if area threat still present
    10. Announce ‘Code Green - all clear” three times when threat has been resolved.
    11. Complete VTRA-Imminent Threat Protocol steps as per above.
    Hold and Secure (code yellow)
    1. Keep your teachers informed of the developments to help keep everyone calm.
    2. During and/ or Following, contact your LG RA and/ or Director of Learning Groups to discuss and determine course of action.
    3. At the end of the day, escort students to respective parent/ guardian.
    4. Together Admin, with Heads of School, will determine next steps 
      1.  initiation of Student at Risk Team
      2.  further investigation with other authoritative bodies if warranted
      3.  follow-up and debriefing if and when safe to resume classes
      4.  email communication to parents and students and re-entry considerations for all involved.
    5. Follow-up email to parents will be drafted in conjunction with LG RA and approved by HoS prior to distribution to families.
    6. Continue developing culture of Healthy Risk Management.
    Drop/ Cover/ Hold-on

    Definition: Used in the event of any event that shakes the building.
    Examples: an earthquake, an explosion

    If indoors and table/desks are available:

    1. Drop to the ground
      1. Take Cover underneath a desk or table. Stay away from windows, light fixtures, and suspended objects. Face away from the windows.
      2. Hold-on to something, such as the legs of the table you are under and stay there until the shaking stops.
    2. When the shaking stops, count for 60 seconds. Wait for directed response; Shelter-in-Place (when external hazards makes leaving the building not advisable) or Evacuation.
    3. If evacuated, report attendance to site administrator. Remain outside and await further instruction. DO NOT re-enter the building.
    4. Coordinator or Adult in Charge will determine next steps.

    Other Situations that may be Encountered

    De-Escalation Procedures
    1. Work in pairs, whenever possible.
    2. Assess the situation as you approach.
    3. Ensure you have a clear exit.
    4. Model calm and confidence. Don’t demand it from the angry or hostile individual.
    5. Identify your name and/or position.
    6. Watch the periphery of the area (for weapons, other perpetrators, help arriving, etc.)
    7. Keep your hands free.
    8. Listen, listen, listen -  let them talk.
    9. Let them ‘save face’.
    10. Maintain casual eye contact.
    11. Keep a barrier between you and the individual when possible.
    12. Let them leave.
    13. Document the incident and report to the Coordinator or Adult in Charge.
    First Aid

    Level A - Minor Injury

    1. Minor injuries such as a scrape, minor cut, bruising, etc. may be treated by any Adults in Charge. Supplies (band aid, ice pack) are available on location as arranged.
    2. Mention to Coordinator and Adult in Charge.
    3. Inform parent and follow- up with family as needed.

    Level B- Major Injury
    Examples: suspected concussion, sustained bleeding, suspected fracture/ broken bone

    1. Inform Coordinator or Adult in Charge
    2. Refer to qualified adult participants or personnel to assess the situation as needed.
    3. Coordinator or Adult in Charge to complete an Accident Report including witness or attendant accounts
    4. Inform parent and follow- up with family as necessary.

    Level C- Medical Emergency
    Examples: Seizure, unconscious/unresponsive, anaphylactic response

    1. Adhere to procedures for a Medical Emergency
    Medical Emergency

    Teacher or Supervising Adult

    1. Call 911 if student is unresponsive
    2. Attend to Student care as needed
    3. Inform First Aid Attendant or Coordinator or Adult in Charge
    4. Await and direct Emergency Medical attendants to the location
    5. Follow directions of care First Aid attendant to emergency location.
    6. Issue appropriate emergency procedures to ensure that students are not unnecessarily exposed to trauma (eg. clear room/area).
    7. Remain calm and reassure students that all possible actions are being taken to care for the injured or ill person and to protect others.
    8. Rejoin your students as soon as possible.
    9. Account for all students and remain with them.

    In the case of a Medical Emergency Coordinator or Adult in Charge to:

    1. Ensure students have adult supervision.
    2. Secure area for follow-up investigation if needed.
    3. Complete an Accident Report
    4. Inform parent and follow- up with family as necessary.

    School Administration will follow up as needed

    Exposure to Blood or Bodily Fluid

    What is exposure?
    An exposure is an accident which results in a break of the skin or exposes the mucous membranes of the eyes, inside the nose, or inside the mouth, to blood or infectious bodily fluids.

    What fluids are potentially infectious?
    All bodily fluids are potentially infectious, particularly blood, semen, fluids issuing from a wound, body cavity or infectious site, and any body fluid visibly contaminated with blood.

    Action
    What to do when an exposure occurs

    The following incidents are potentially harmful:

    1. Skin is punctured with a contaminated sharp object.
    2. The mucous membrane is splashed with blood and certain body fluids.
    3. Non-intact skin is splashed with blood and certain body fluids.

    If any of the above exposure incidents occur, follow these steps:

    1. Get first aid immediately:
      1. If the mucous membrane of eyes, nose, mouth are affected, flush with lots of clean water at a sink or eyewash station.
      2. If there is a sharps injury allow the wound to bleed freely. Then wash the area thoroughly with
        non-abrasive and water.
      3. If an area of non-intact skin is affected, wash the area with non-abrasive soap and water.
    2. Report the incident as soon as possible to your supervisor and first aid person.
    3. Seek medical attention immediately- preferably within two hours at the closest hospital ER or healthcare
        facility.
    4. Please do not touch! Contact the appropriate facility or venue personnel for proper clean-up.
    Overdose- Opioid

    Call 911 if you suspect an overdose, the sooner you call the better the chance of recovery. While you are waiting for first responders to arrive, follow SAVE ME protocol.

    S - Stimulate. Check if person is responsive, can you wake them up?
    A - Airway. Make sure there is nothing in the mouth blocking the airway or stopping them from breathing.
    V - Ventilate. Help them breathe. Pinch nose, cover mouth with mask and breath every 5 seconds.
    E -  Evaluate. Do you see any improvement?

    M - Muscular injection. Inject one dose (1cc) of naloxone (if available) into a muscle.
    E - Evaluate and support. Is the person breathing? If they are not awake in 5 minutes, give one more 1cc dose naloxone.

    If you need to leave the person alone for any reason, place them into the recovery position before you leave to keep the airway clear and prevent choking.

    Field or Bus Trip Emergency i.e. Learning Camp or LG Activity
    1. LG proposal and approvals as per LG Event Planning Steps
      1. Include inherent risks and complete waiver forms as appropriate
      2. As indicated in the event planning steps, ensure access to
        1. Student medical and safety forms
        2. Student SSS forms
        3. Legal Alert information
        4. Emergency contact information for each child
        5. Photo waiver information
      3. Adhere to the related School and LG Policies and Procedures
      4. Adhere to the Emergency Protocols and Procedures
    2. Coordinator or Adult in Charge to ensure a First Aid kit is either available on-site, or brought along with.
    3. Parent accompaniment recommended for full student experience and extension of learning at home.
    4. Parents are responsible for the care and supervision of their child(ren) at all times where indicated i.e. not a drop off event.

    Families are expected to arrange their own transportation to and from field trip activities. In the rare event that an accident or emergency occurs while transporting students: 

    1. Account for all students.
    2. Release students only to parents, guardians or authorized representative. Record name to whom students were released.
    3. At the scene, do not discuss the accident with any onlookers. Never speculate about what happened. Never accept or place blame.

    In all of the above scenarios, it is important to complete an accident or incident report should the need arise.

    Parent and Teacher Role Policy

    Parents or guardians have a supporting role under the direction of the teacher. The role of the parent or guardian is to support the teacher in implementing the education plan for the learner.

    The role of parents should be to:

    Students ready to take responsibility for learning should increasingly:

    Personal Information Privacy Policy for Employees and Volunteers

    The School’s Commitment to You

    Safeguarding personal information of employees and volunteers is a fundamental concern of Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). The school is committed to meeting or exceeding the privacy standards established by British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) and any other applicable legislation.

    This Personal Information Privacy Policy describes the policies and practices of HCOS regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information about employees and volunteers, including the steps the school has taken to ensure personal and financial information is handled appropriately and securely.

    HCOS may add, modify or remove portions of this Personal Information Privacy Policy when it is considered appropriate to do so, and any such changes will be effective upon giving notice of the revised policy. The most recent update of this Personal Information Privacy Policy can be found in the [Staff Manual/Policies and Procedures Manual] of HCOS or is available from administration. This Personal Information Privacy Policy may be supplemented or modified from time to time.

    Ten Privacy Principles

    As part of HCOS’s commitment, the Ten Privacy Principles govern the actions of the school as they relate to the use of personal information. This Personal Information Privacy Policy describes the Ten Privacy Principles and provides further details regarding HCOS’s compliance with the principles.

    Definition

    In this Personal Information Privacy Policy, the following term has the meaning set out below.

    “personal information” means any information about an identifiable individual, as further defined under British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act or other applicable laws. Personal information excludes the name, position name or title, business telephone number, business address, business email, and business fax number of an individual, as well as any publicly available information as designated under applicable laws, such as information available from a public telephone directory or from a public registry.

    Principle 1 - Accountability

    HCOS is responsible for maintaining and protecting the personal information under its control. In fulfilling this mandate, the school designates (an) individual(s) who is(are) accountable for the school’s compliance with the Ten Privacy Principles. This individual is the Privacy Officer of the school.

    You may contact our Privacy Officer as follows:

    Heritage Christian Online School

     

    Attention:

    Privacy Officer

    Address:

    905 Badke Road, Kelowna, BC V1X5Z5

    Phone:

    1-877-862-2375

    Fax:

    250-762-9277

    Email:

    privacy@onlineschool.ca

    Principle 2 - Identifying Purposes

    What Information is Collected, Used and Disclosed?

    Employees

    HCOS collects, uses and discloses personal information about employees in order to establish, manage and terminate the employment relationship and for other purposes identified when the information is collected. Set out below are some examples of personal information about employees collected, used and disclosed by HCOS:

    Volunteers

    HCOS collects, uses and discloses personal information about volunteers for the purposes of recruiting volunteers and establishing and managing an effective volunteer program and for other purposes identified when the information is collected. Page 5 Set out below are some examples of personal information about volunteers collected, used and disclosed by HCOS:

     

    Principle 3 - Consent

    Requirements for consent to collection, use or disclosure of personal information vary depending on circumstances and on the type of personal information that is intended to be collected, used or disclosed. In determining whether consent is required and, if so, what form of consent is appropriate, HCOS will take into account both the sensitivity of the personal information and the purposes for which HCOS will use the information. Consent may be express, implied (including through use of “opt-out” consent where appropriate), or deemed.

    Most personal information is collected, used and disclosed for the purposes of establishing, managing and terminating the employment or volunteer relationship. In most cases, consent is not required. In other cases, consent will be sought or implied where it is reasonable to do so.

    From time to time, HCOS may advise employees and volunteers of other purposes for which it will collect, use or disclose personal information, in which case the school will, if appropriate, obtain consent for collection, use or disclosure of that personal information.

    Principle 4 - Limiting Collection

    HCOS will limit the personal information collected to that information necessary for the purposes identified by the school.

    Principle 5 - Use, Disclosure and Retention

    HCOS will only use, disclose and retain personal information for the purpose for which it was collected unless the individual has otherwise consented, or when its use, disclosure or retention is required or permitted by law.

    How is Information Used?

    Personal information about employees and volunteers is used for the purposes identified under Principle 2.

    If for any reason personal information is required to fulfill another purpose, the school will notify the employee or volunteer of that purpose.

    HCOS may use anonymous information, such as information collected through surveys or statistical information about employees and volunteers to improve the school’s operations.

    When May Information be Disclosed?

    HCOS may disclose an individual’s personal information to others in connection with the purpose for which it was collected, as consented to by the individual, or as required or permitted by law. Personal information about employees is disclosed to third parties for purposes related to the employment relationship, including to:

    Personal information about volunteers may be disclosed for the purposes of establishing and managing an effective volunteer program and for other purposes identified when the information is collected. Information may also be disclosed when required or permitted by law.

    The school does not sell, lease or trade information about employees and volunteers to other parties.

    Outside Service Suppliers

    At HCOS, the school sometimes contacts outside organizations to perform specialized services such as printing, payroll services, market research or data processing. [For example, the school gives its yearbook publisher the information required to produce the annual yearbook.] Suppliers of specialized services are given only the information necessary to perform those services, and HCOS takes appropriate steps to ensure that such information is securely transferred and stored and is used only to fulfill the purposes for which it was disclosed to the service provider.

    Restricting Sharing Information

    If an individual wishes to limit the sharing of personal information as permitted by law, the individual must submit to the Privacy Officer a written letter specifying which items of personal information are to be limited and to whom these items are to be restricted. The Privacy Officer will advise the individual whether the requested information can be restricted in the manner requested.

    How Long Is Personal Information Retained?

    Personal information will only be retained for the period of time required to fulfill the purpose for which it was collected. Once the personal information is no longer required to be retained to fulfill the purposes for which it was collected and is no longer required or permitted to be retained for legal or business purposes, it will be destroyed or made anonymous.

    Principle 6 – Accuracy

    HCOS will take appropriate steps to ensure that personal information collected by HCOS is as accurate and complete as is reasonably required in connection with the purposes for which it was collected, used or disclosed. Employees and volunteers are responsible for providing up-to-date personal information to the school.

    How May I Update Outdated or Incorrect Information?

    An individual may, upon written request to HCOS, request that HCOS correct an error or omission in any personal information that is under HCOS’s control and HCOS will, as appropriate, amend the information as requested and send the corrected personal information to each third party to which it has disclosed the information during the preceding year.

    Principle 7- Safeguarding Personal Information

    HCOS will protect personal information by security safeguards that are appropriate to the sensitivity level of the information.

    Employees and volunteers will be appropriately educated about the importance of privacy and they are required to follow the school’s policies and procedures regarding handling of personal information.

    An employee’s failure to abide by school policies may result in discipline, up to and including termination of employment. A volunteer’s failure to do so may result in termination of the volunteer relationship.

    Employee Files

    Employee files are stored in secured filing cabinets. Access to personal information is restricted to authorized employees who have a legitimate reason for accessing it.

    Electronic Security

    The school manages electronic files appropriately with passwords and security measures that limit access by unauthorized personnel. The school’s security practices are reviewed periodically to ensure that the privacy of personal information is not compromised.

    Principle 8 - Openness

    HCOS will make information available to individuals concerning the policies and practices that apply to the management of personal information. Individuals may direct any questions or enquiries with respect to the school’s privacy policies or practices to the Privacy Officer of HCOS.

    Principle 9 - Individual Access

    HCOS will inform an individual, upon the individual’s request, of the existence, use and disclosure of the individual’s personal information, and shall give the individual access to it in accordance with the law.

    How May I Access My Personal Information?

    An employee or volunteer may access and verify any personal information with appropriate notice so that the office is able to supply the information required.

    Principle 10 - Complaint Process

    Individuals may question compliance with the above principles.

    Questions, Concerns and Complaints

    Questions, concerns and complaints about privacy, confidentiality and personal information handling policies and practices of the school should be directed to the school’s Privacy Officer as referenced above.

    For more information please see the Conflict Resolution and Appeal Policy

    Personal Information Privacy Policy for Parents and Students

    The School’s Commitment to You

    Safeguarding personal information of parents and students is a fundamental concern of Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). The school is committed to meeting or exceeding the privacy standards established by British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) and any other applicable legislation.

    This Personal Information Privacy Policy describes the policies and practices of HCOS regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information about students and parents, including the steps the school has taken to ensure personal and financial information is handled appropriately and securely.

    HCOS may add, modify or remove portions of this Personal Information Privacy Policy when it is considered appropriate to do so, and any such changes will be effective upon giving notice of the revised policy. You may ask for the most recent update of this Personal Information Privacy Policy at the school office. This Personal Information Privacy Policy may be supplemented or modified by agreements entered into between HCOS and an individual from time to time.

    Ten Privacy Principles

    As part of HCOS’ commitment, the Ten Privacy Principles govern the actions of the school as they relate to the use of personal information. This Personal Information Privacy Policy describes the Ten Privacy Principles and provides further details regarding HCOS’ compliance with the principles.

    Definitions

    In this Personal Information Privacy Policy, the following terms have the meanings set out below:

    “personal information” means any information about an identifiable individual, as further defined under British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act or other applicable laws. Personal information excludes the name, position name or title, business telephone number, business address, business email, and business fax number of an individual, as well as any publicly available information as designated under applicable laws, such as information available from a public telephone directory or from a public registry.

    “Parent” means the parent, guardian, or other legal representative of a student.

    “Student” means a prospective, current, or past student of HCOS.

    Principle 1 – Accountability

    HCOS is responsible for maintaining and protecting the personal information under its control. In fulfilling this mandate, the school designates (an) individual(s) who is(are) accountable for the school’s compliance with the Ten Privacy Principles. This individual is the Privacy Officer of the school.

    You may contact our Privacy Officer as follows:

    Heritage Christian Online School

    Attention:

    Privacy Officer

    Address:

    905 Badke Road, Kelowna, BC V1X5Z5

    Phone:

    1-877-862-2375

    Fax:

    250-762-9277

    Email:

    privacy@onlineschool.ca

    Principle 2 – Identifying Purposes

    Heritage Christian Online School will, before or at the time personal information is collected, identify the purposes for which the information is collected, used and disclosed.

    What Information is Collected?

    HCOS collects and uses personal information to provide students with the best possible educational services enunciated by the Mission statement of the school. Most of the information the school collects comes to the school directly from parents and students or is information regarding the student’s school activities, performance or behaviour, such as attendance records or grades. For example, when a student applies to register in the school, the school will ask you to provide the information that enables it to complete the registration process. This also includes information on academic, health, and personal matters needed by the school to provide the best possible education and co-curricular programs. HCOS also collects information in connection with the use of its computer systems.

    Personal information may also be collected and used and disclosed in the course of the operation of building security systems, including video and other surveillance systems.

    Principle 3 – Consent

    HCOS will obtain consent of the individual for the collection, use or disclosure of personal information except where the law states exemptions, grants permission, or creates a requirement for collection, use, or disclosure of personal information.

    Requirements for consent to collection, use or disclosure of personal information vary depending on circumstances and on the type of personal information that is intended to be collected, used or disclosed. In determining whether consent is required and, if so, what form of consent is appropriate, HCOS will take into account both the sensitivity of the personal information and the purposes for which HCOS will use the information. Consent may be express, implied (including through use of “opt-out” consent where appropriate), or deemed. For example, if an individual provides his/her mailing address and requests information regarding a particular service, consent to use the address to provide the requested information may be implied.

    On giving reasonable written notice to HCOS, an individual may withdraw consent to the collection, use or disclosure of his or her personal information. Upon notice of withdrawal of consent, HCOS will notify the individual of the likely consequences of withdrawing his or her consent and, except where otherwise required or permitted by law, HCOS will stop collecting, using or disclosing the personal information as requested.

    If a person provides HCOS or its service providers or agents with personal information about an individual, the person represents that it has all necessary authority and/or has obtained all necessary consents from such individual to enable HCOS to collect, use and disclose such personal information for the purposes set forth in this Personal Information Privacy Policy.

    Principle 4 – Limiting Collection

    HCOS will limit the personal information collected to that information necessary for the purposes identified by the school.

    Principle 5 – Use, Disclosure and Retention

    HCOS will only use, disclose and retain personal information for the purpose for which it was collected unless the individual has otherwise consented, or when its use, disclosure or retention is required or permitted by law.

    How is Information Used?

    HCOS uses personal information as follows:

    If for any reason personal information is required to fulfill another purpose, the school will, where appropriate, notify you and ask you for your consent before the school proceeds.

    HCOS may use anonymous information, such as information collected through surveys or statistical information regarding students, to constantly improve our school.

    When May Information be Disclosed?

    HCOS may disclose an individual’s personal information to others in connection with the purpose for which it was collected, as consented to by the individual, or as required or permitted by law. The following are some examples of how Heritage Christian Online School may disclose personal information.

    When Authorized by You

    In some cases, when communication is over the telephone, your consent to the use and/or disclosure of your information will be obtained verbally. In other cases such as when you communicate through e-mail, your consent will be obtained electronically.

    When Required by Law

    The type of information the school is legally required to disclose most often relates to family court issues, legal proceedings, court orders and government tax reporting requirements. Student information as per Form 1701 is annually filed with the Ministry of Education.

    Only the information specifically requested is disclosed and the school takes precautions to satisfy itself that the authorities making the request have legitimate grounds to do so.

    When Permitted by Law

    The school is legally permitted to disclose some personal information in situations such as an investigation of illegal activities, reasonable methods to collect overdue accounts, a medical emergency or suspicion of illegal activities, etc. Only pertinent information is disclosed.

    The school does not sell, lease or trade information about you to other parties.

    Outside Third Party Service Suppliers

    At HCOS, the school sometimes contacts outside organizations to perform specialized services such as printing, student assessments, subscriptions, market research or data processing. Suppliers of specialized services are given only the information necessary to perform those services, and HCOS takes appropriate steps to ensure that such information is securely transferred and stored and is used only to fulfill the purposes for which it was disclosed to the service provider.

    Restricting Sharing Information

    If you choose to limit the sharing of your personal information, please contact the school office and submit a written letter specifying which items of personal information you wish to limit, and to whom you wish these items to be restricted. Please remember that certain agencies, by law, have access to certain types of personal information.

    How Long Is Personal Information Retained?

    Personal information will only be retained for the period of time required to fulfill the purpose for which it was collected. Once the personal information is no longer required to be retained to fulfill the purposes for which it was collected and is no longer required or permitted to be retained for legal or business purposes, it will be destroyed or made anonymous.

    Principle 6 – Accuracy

     HCOS will take appropriate steps to ensure that personal information collected by HCOS is as accurate and complete as is reasonably required in connection with the purposes for which it was collected, used or disclosed.

    How May I Update Outdated or Incorrect Information?

    An individual may, upon written request to HCOS, request that HCOS correct an error or omission in any personal information that is under HCOS’ control and HCOS will, as appropriate, amend the information as requested and send the corrected personal information to each third party to which it has disclosed the information during the preceding year.

    Principle 7 – Safeguarding Personal Information

    HCOS will protect personal information by security safeguards that are appropriate to the sensitivity level of the information.

    The School’s Employees

    In the course of daily operations, access to personal information is restricted to authorized employees who have a legitimate reason for accessing it. For example, teachers will have access to personal information about students but not your account with the school.

    Employees are appropriately educated about the importance of privacy and they are required to follow the school’s policies and procedures regarding handling of personal information.

    Student Files

    Student files are stored in secured filing cabinets and/or in digital format. Access is restricted to only those employees (teachers, teacher-aides, counselors, secretaries, etc.) who, by nature of their work, are required to see them.

    Electronic Security

    The school manages electronic files appropriately with passwords and security measures that limit access by unauthorized personnel. The school’s security practices are reviewed periodically to ensure that the privacy of personal information is not compromised.

    Principle 8 – Openness

    HCOS will make information available to individuals concerning the policies and practices that apply to the management of personal information.

    Individuals may direct any questions or enquiries with respect to the school’s privacy policies or practices to the Privacy Officer of HCOS.

    Principle 9 – Individual Access

    HCOS will inform an individual, upon the individual’s request, of the existence, use and disclosure of the individual’s personal information, and shall give the individual access to it in accordance with the law.

    How May I Access My Personal Information?

    Individuals may access and verify any personal information with appropriate notice so that the office is able to supply the information required. Most of this information is available in the registration forms and other forms that you filled out.

    Parent Access to Student Personal Information

    A parent may access and verify school records of the student, with appropriate notice during normal school hours. In situations of family breakdown, the school will grant access to records of students in accordance with the law.

    Student Access to Student Personal Information

    A student may access and verify school records of the student, with appropriate notice during normal school hours.

    Principle 10 – Complaint Process

    Individuals may question compliance with the above principles.

    Questions, Concerns and Complaints

    Questions, concerns, and complaints about privacy, confidentiality and personal information handling policies and practices of the school should be directed to the school’s Privacy Officer by calling the school office. If necessary, individuals will be referred to use the school’s complaint procedure and appeals policies.

    Plagiarism Policy

    Our expectation of online students is that they act with integrity and make every effort to present original and/or documented source work when submitting assignments. If a student plagiarizes, they have violated the school expectations and there will be consequences.

    Here is a dictionary definition of plagiarize from Webster's New International Dictionary of the English Language:

    To steal or purloin and pass off as one's own the ideas, words, artistic productions of another; to use without due credit the ideas expressions or productions of another

    Credit, in the form of a citation, must be given for any content in an assignment that is not original. 

     Plagiarism Levels & Consequences

    Plagiarism Level

    Level 1

    Most of the student's work is original but there may be phrases and/or a few lines that have not been cited correctly.

    Level 2

    Significant portions of the assignment are not the student's own work. Multiple paragraphs and/or someone else's ideas have been used without proper acknowledgement. This also included repeated paraphrasing of someone else's work.

    Level 3

    The majority of the work has been copied from another source. OR this is the second time the student has plagiarized at level 2.

    Level 4

    Second time the student has plagiarized at level 3 OR the third time at level 2.

    Consequence

    Level 1

    The student mark will be reduced between 15 and 50%, depending on the amount of plagiarism that is found in the work.

    Level 2

    The student mark is 0% on that assignment. The student will be given one chance to re-do the assignment and one additional essay assignment will be given. The student's parents will be informed.

    Level 3

    The student mark is 0%. No chance to re-do or complete make-up assignments. The student's parents and administration will be informed. A note will be placed in the student's file.

    Level 4

    The student will automatically fail the course.

    Please Note: In order to deter and detect plagiarism, teachers have access to extensive plagiarism detection websites and programs.

    Procedural Fairness Policy

    These guidelines explain in general terms the principles which are the basis of “procedural fairness” and provide guidance as to how Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) can effectively address the requirements of “procedural fairness” when developing policies governing their day to day operations. HCOS should ensure it incorporates these principles and requirements when developing rules and procedures affecting students or staff.

    Requirements of Procedural Fairness
    1. If a decision-maker (e.g., a principal or authority) is intending to consider a matter which may affect a person’s rights, that person should be informed of the matter;
    2. The person should be given a reasonable opportunity to make oral or written submissions to the decision-maker on the matter being considered;
    3. The person is entitled to know and answer the case against them, that is to say, be informed of and be given the opportunity to respond to all information submitted which might influence a decision, prior to the decision being made;
    4. The person should be told the reasons for the decision;
    5. The decision-maker should act in a manner which is unbiased, fair and open-minded.
    Procedural Fairness and Students

    Basic elements of procedural fairness when dealing with student discipline include:

    1. Students need to be treated with respect and dignity and to know what is expected of them. HCOS should enact codes of conduct and rules that are clear and well communicated
    2. In accordance with school policy, a student who is accused of breaching a rule should be notified of that of which he/she is accused, with the essential facts of what he/she is alleged to have done.

      [NOTE: In more serious cases, notification should also be given to a student’s parents.]

    3. An accused student should be given an opportunity to tell his/her side of the story. The right to be heard is a fundamental element of procedural fairness. Where the stakes are minor, this can be satisfied by a director or teacher asking the student to explain her/his actions. More serious matters require more formal investigation and documentation.
    4. The student and parent should be informed of any appeal or review procedure in accordance with school policy. Some form of appeal, e.g., to the principal, superintendent, principal’s or board’s discipline or appeal committee, or authority/school board, should be provided for in school policy, depending on the severity of the discipline.
    5. There should be an assurance of no retribution for pursuing an appeal or review.

    From FISA:
    PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS DEVELOPED BY THE FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOL ASSOCIATIONS IN CONSULTATION WITH THE INSPECTOR OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

    I. PREAMBLE

    School authorities formulate policies and procedures to deal with a variety of situations. It is recommended that schools formulate written policies, particularly for situations where the potential for disagreement in human relationships is high. This document is not a policy but, it is a general statement of principles that will help schools achieve procedural fairness in the policies and procedures they formulate.

    II. INTRODUCTION

    It is in the best interests of independent school authorities (“authorities”) and school officials in their employ (e.g., principals and administrative teaching staff) that procedures followed in making decisions affecting students or staff are fair and are seen to be fair. This principle applies equally to any process for appeal involving decisions of authorities’ school officials.

    Fair procedures reassure students, parents and staff by providing integrity and consistency in respect to decisions made in the school setting which in turn will help to avoid misunderstandings and disputes.

    Increasingly parents who feel they and their children have been unfairly treated as a result of a decision of a school official or authority, are seeking recourse to the court system or a statutory tribunal, e.g., the Human Rights Commission. To assist authorities and school officials, the Federation of Independent School Associations (FISA), in consultation with the Office of the Inspector of Independent Schools, has developed these best practice guidelines in the hope that their use will help independent school communities resolve matters internally and reduce the likelihood of judicial proceedings.

    III. PURPOSE OF THESE GUIDELINES

    These guidelines explain in general terms the principles which are the basis of “procedural fairness” and provide guidance as to how independent schools can effectively address the requirements of “procedural fairness” when developing policies governing their day to day operations. An independent school should ensure it incorporates these principles and requirements when developing rules and procedures affecting students or staff. When developing rules and procedures an independent school should refer any legal issues or concerns to its lawyers for advice. Professional advice at an early stage may avoid problems and save expense later.

    IV. REQUIREMENTS OF “PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS”
    V. PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS AND STUDENTS

    The following paragraphs A and B are adapted from Keeping Students Safe: A Practical Guide for Principals and Vice-Principals (June 1999)

    A. Basic elements of procedural fairness when dealing with student discipline include:

    1. Students need to be treated with respect and dignity and to know what is expected of them. The school authority/board and the school should enact codes of conduct and rules that are clear and well communicated.

    [NOTE: A practice which an independent school may wish to consider is to have students and parents provide written acknowledgment that they have received a copy of and agree to comply with the school’s rules of student conduct. This will avoid possible future claims by students and parents that they were not aware of or disagreed with the rules.]

    1. In accordance with school policy, a student who is accused of breaching a rule should be notified of that of which he/she is accused, with the essential facts of what he/she is alleged to have done.

    [NOTE: In more serious cases, notification should also be given to a student’s parents.]

    1. An accused student should be given an opportunity to tell his/her side of the story. The right to be heard is a fundamental element of procedural fairness. Where the stakes are minor, this can be satisfied by the principal or teacher asking the student to explain her/his actions. More serious matters require more formal investigation and documentation.
    2. The student and parent should be informed of any appeal or review procedure in accordance with school policy. Some form of appeal, e.g., to the principal, superintendent, principal’s or board’s discipline or appeal committee, or authority/school board, should be provided for in school policy, depending on the severity of the discipline.
    3. There should be an assurance of no retribution for pursuing an appeal or review.

    B. How can school authorities/boards ensure that they are unbiased?

    “Bias” may occur when the mind of the decision-maker is in some way pre-disposed to a particular result, or is closed with respect to particular issues and as a result the decision-maker lacks impartiality or neutrality. The British Columbia Court of Appeal in a case commented as follows:

    “to charge such persons with bias is not merely to say that they would be likely to decide a particular matter in a particular way, but to say that they would do so improperly. The charge implies that the (decision-maker) would not decide the case independently, and on the basis of the evidence, but would do so under improper influence, and with a view to achieving an extraneous or otherwise improper purpose.”

    Authorities and board members should follow the following guidelines to avoid bias or the appearance of bias:

    1. Don’t prejudge the evidence of the particular circumstances of the student’s case, or give the appearance (e.g., in public statements) of having done so, even if you have strong convictions on such matters.
    2. When selecting persons to hear a case or an appeal of a decision, avoid those who have a close out-of-school relationship, family ties or adversarial relationship with the student or student’s family, or a staff member who is closely involved in the incident.

    [NOTE: In small communities it may be difficult to find persons who do not have an appearance of bias regarding a particular case or an appeal of a decision. In such situations, it is advisable that the school’s procedures allow for the appointment of a person(s) from outside the school community to handle the case or appeal.]

    1. If a person (e.g., principal, staff member or committee member) has made a previous decision, or has been a member of a committee that has made a previous decision, that now is under appeal, such a person should only participate in the appeal for the purpose of providing testimony. Such a person should not participate in decision-making at appeal levels.
    2. An appeal-hearing committee should not hear or receive evidence that will not be shared with the other party in the dispute. Do not receive evidence or representations from administrators or staff in the absence of the person appealing, and avoid the appearance of doing so.

    C. What are appropriate procedural protections?

    The requirements of procedural fairness will depend on the seriousness of the matter being decided. At the low end of the scale, a minor infraction may be appropriately dealt with by an informal meeting between the principal or teacher and the student.

    A decision respecting the possible suspension or expulsion of a student would be at the high end of the scale because of the serious implications for the student. These cases call for careful observance of all elements of procedural fairness and a full hearing involving the following:

    [NOTE: In a particular case a student may request to be represented by legal counsel at the hearing. The decision-maker should give careful consideration to such request, having particular regard to the seriousness and/or complexity of the matter, and permit representation in appropriate situations.]

    D. Mediation

    For some types of disputes, a mediation process may be a more appropriate and less confrontational way of resolving a dispute.

    An authority should consider if it wishes to adopt a mediation process and the types of cases to which mediation would apply. Some associations of independent schools have a mediation policy in place. Also, the Dispute Resolution Office of the Ministry of Attorney General maintains a roster of BC mediators, and as a public service, will provide applicants with information respecting suitable, qualified mediators (250-356-8147 or toll-free 1-800-713-0433).

    E. Summary of Key Points

    1. Authorities and independent school principals should:
      • establish rules of conduct for students attending educational programs at an independent school;
      • ensure students and parents are aware of the rules of conduct and agree to abide by them.
      • ensure that the principles of procedural fairness and natural justice are followed when decisions are made affecting the rights of a student whether the decision relates to a matter of discipline, e.g., suspension or expulsion from school, or to an important facet of the student’s educational program, e.g., admission into a class or a mark assigned by a teacher;
      • at least in more serious matters provide an appeal process which gives the student and/or parent an opportunity for a fair and unbiased review of the original decision.
    2. Establishing proper rules and procedures helps promote fairness and consistency in dealings with students and in the decision-making process and minimizes the possibility of successful legal challenges and the imposition of court imposed remedies.
    3. The level of procedural protections will depend on the seriousness of the matter. Minor matters may only require an informal and summary process. Serious matters such as student suspension or expulsion will justify a full hearing. Establish appeal or review procedures (e.g., to principal, discipline committee and the board of the authority) depending on the seriousness of the matter. When developing review or appeal procedures, independent schools should consider the breadth of the appeals committee’s mandate. For example, will it be limited to a review of the procedures followed by the original decision-maker to ensure fairness and correctness, or will the appeal tribunal have wider powers, such as, reviewing and modifying the disciplinary actions taken, or reviewing all the evidence to determine guilt or innocence, i.e., a total rehearing of the case.
    4. A mediation process may be an appropriate option in resolving certain matters.

    VI. PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS AND TEACHERS/EMPLOYEES

    The terms and conditions of employment of teachers and other employees at an independent school will be governed by the contract of employment between the employee and the school authority.

    1. Collective Agreements
      If the employee is part of a bargaining unit represented by a bargaining agent (e.g., association or union) under the Labour Relations Code, the employee’s terms of employment will be governed by the collective agreement negotiated by the bargaining agent with the school authority. A collective agreement will usually contain comprehensive provisions respecting procedural fairness in matters such as discipline, work assignment and promotions. Grievance, appeal and arbitration procedures would generally be included in the collective agreement.
    2. Individual Agreements
      If an employee is not covered by a collective agreement, terms of employment will be governed by the individual contract of employment between the employee and the school authority. It is important that a contract of employment clearly sets out the duties and responsibilities of the teacher or other employee as well as those of the school authority. There should be procedurally fair provisions dealing with discipline, appeals and grievances. Clear and fair employment arrangements helps to promote an atmosphere of mutual trust in the school setting. This can minimize difficult and time consuming employee disputes and possible court actions. Because of the importance of the contract of employment it is recommended that school authorities, with the assistance of their legal advisors, develop clear and comprehensive formats for their employment contracts.
    3. Employment Standards Act
      The Provincial Employment Standards Act contains important basic requirements respecting the conditions of employment of employees. In dealings with its employees, authorities and independent school officials should ensure compliance with the statutory requirements.

    Professional Development Policy

    Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) teachers and administrators are encouraged to participate in professional development on a yearly basis.

    All HCOS teachers and staff are required to attend the RenewED Conference the week prior to the start of the school year. Teachers will receive a stipend for travel, food and lodging for RenewED if applicable.

    In April, HCOS will host a professional development day (HCOS Connect) in each region following the April RTM. Teachers are required to attend this one day event and will receive a stipend for travel and food if applicable.

    All teachers are also required to attend three Regional Teacher Meetings each year. Two are in person (November and April), and one is held online via Zoom (February).

    In addition, teachers may apply to attend various conferences and workshops in their area. If the sessions are relevant and applicable then funds may be provided for registration.

    Sexual and Reproductive Health Alternative Delivery Policy

    Heritage Christian Online School supports parents and guardians to be actively involved with their child(ren)s education. Family guidance and input on the new curricula; Sexual Reproductive and Health, is welcomed by HCOS and also by the BC Ministry of Education.The BC Ministry of Education Alternative in the Physical and Health Education policy, states that families are allowed to choose an alternative delivery method for instruction, in consultation with the school. If students would feel more comfortable learning about these topics by other means, HCOS will endorse doing so after receiving parents’ or guardian’s permission. Please contact the course teacher to make arrangements.

    For reference: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/education-training/administration/legislation-policy/public-schools/alternative-delivery-in-the-physical-and-health-curriculum

    Policy:

    The Physical and Health Education 10 provincial curricula include topics related to reproduction and sexuality that some students and their parents/guardians may feel more comfortable addressing by means other than instruction by a teacher in a regular classroom setting. These include learning standards outlined in the following education program guides:

    In such instances, students, with their parents' or guardians' consent, may arrange to address topics related to reproduction and sexuality by an alternative means. This must been arranged in consultation with their school. The alternate means must be agreed upon by the students, their parents or guardians, and the school.

    The alternate delivery policy does not allow students to “opt-out” of learning about these topics. It is expected that students will, in consultation with their school, demonstrate their knowledge of the learning standard(s) have arranged to address by alternative means.

    This alternate delivery policy does not apply to any other learning standards or learning outcomes in the education program guides listed above. Nor does it apply to any other British Columbia provincial curriculum.

    Procedure:

    Boards of Education and Independent School Authorities should have procedures in place to enable students to address learning standards covered in this policy. Procedures should also be in place to ensure that students have met these learning standards.

    There are several ways in which the preferences of students and their parents or guardians regarding alternative delivery can be accommodated. The following are some examples:

    Boards of education and Independent School Authorities may also invite parents/guardians to propose means for alternative delivery.

    Special Education - Programs, Admission & Delivery Policies

    HCOS Response to Intervention (RTI) Model

    HCOS uses a Response to Intervention (RTI) framework, utilizing formative assessment to regularly collect data to make instructional decisions in a multi-tier model. While valuing prevention and early intervention, teachers use ongoing assessment to inform teaching practice and allocate instructional resources to provide appropriate, evidence-based interventions.

    Central elements of all RTI models include early screening of all students to identify those at risk for academic difficulties, implementing research-based interventions matched to student need and increasing intensity of intervention when needed. RTI also involves continuous monitoring and recording of student progress during interventions to guide decisions for both the student (e.g. further assessment, individualized planning) and the teacher (e.g. using small group or one- to-one learning contexts, topics for professional development).

    Although RTI originates from special education, it is intended for use with all students in general education. For further details, consider Tiered Approaches to the Education of Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Tier 1: Universal Programming

    Most students, roughly 80-85 percent, are in Tier 1 with mainstream teachers and mainstream expectations and achievement.

    Tier 1 may include Learning Services (LS) Monitoring students, those who are minimally meeting expectations but whose needs are being managed by teachers with minimal Learning Services Consultant (LSC) involvement.

    Depending on the teacher's training and experience, they may ask their LSC for suggestions. If the teacher asks and there seems to be reason for concern, then the student will be considered to be on LS Monitoring status.

    Tier 2: Targeted Interventions

    Tier 2 students comprise approximately 5-15 percent of the student population. They are typically in one of two categories.

    LS Student

    LS students are struggling to minimally meet or are not meeting expectations. They have been referred to LS using the LS Referral Form and their teachers are receiving regular LS consultation through the LSC on how to help these students and families.

    These are non-designated students who have adaptations in place in the Student Learning Plan (SLP) Adaptions Box. For students requiring significant support, an Individual Education Plan (IEP) may be considered along with diagnostic assessment; these students are expected to have regular or adapted courses.

    If needed, students may receive a small subsidy for therapy or investigative assessment (e.g. Speech and Language Pathologist (SLP) assessment for speech impediment, psycho-educational testing for programming direction, etc.).

    High Incidence Students

    High Incidence students have been designated according to Ministry of Education guidelines, whether K: Mild Intellectual Disabilities, P: Gifted, Q: Learning Disabilities, or R: Students Requiring Behaviour Support or Students with Mental Illness. While these designations do not receive additional funding support from the Ministry, these students may need significant support.

    These students typically remain with their teacher but are transferred from the LSC to the LS Regional Administrator (RA) in order to receive graduated support. The LS RA ensures an IEP is in place; students may also receive a subsidy through the LS Department to meet their needs.

    Tier 3: Low Incidence Special Education (SE) Students

    Special Educations (SE) students with an A-H (funded) category designations comprise approximately five percent of a student population. These students are placed on an SE teacher’s caseload and receive a substantial needs-based student budget to meet their proposed IEP goals.

    Programs, Admissions, and Delivery

    Learning Services (LS) Support

    Our Learning Services (LS) team works to equip teachers to serve the needs of their Tier 1 and Tier 2 students.

    Internal Admission

    To provide equitable access to all students, teachers should confirm student learning needs with an LS Consultant (LSC), and, if further intervention is needed, recommend the LS Referral process to the family. The parent and/or teacher then submits the LS Referral Form to the LS team, who upon review, continues to assess the need through screening assessments (numeracy and literacy achievement, and cognitive skills).

    Program and Delivery

    HCOS provides LS/SE students with teacher-directed individualized programs comprised of a combination of in-house resources and community-based professional support. Teachers who have an LS student on their caseload are encouraged to attend monthly one-to-one sessions with their LSC. Consultations offer practical support for individualized LS/SE related strategies, adaptations, modifications, resources, screening and/or programming assessments, appointments/therapies, and IEP creation. LS consultants draw from experience, research and professional development, and from the various LS/SE resources available through our Learning Commons (library). 

    Designated Special Education Support

    Special Education (SE) teachers work with Tier 3 students, directing programs to meet the educational needs of students in collaboration the student's IEP team, which includes parents/guardians, education assistants, and community-based professionals.

    External Admission

    1. HCOS conducts three program intakes annually: September, February, and May/June (i.e., pre-approval for the following school year).
    2. To indicate interest, the parent fills out the HCOS application for Distributed Learning Enrolment at the HCOS website.(NOTE: Only Enrolled students receive assistance from our HCOS SE program; “Registered" students do not).
    3. The Registrar calls the parent to discuss Distributed Learning (DL) and general program offerings and requirements. If the student is a Special Needs (SE) student, the Registrar connects with the SE Regional Administrator (RA) to discuss teacher availability, regional dynamics, etc.
    4. If there is potential for a good fit, the SE Regional Administrator (RA) calls the parent to discuss SE program requirements, SE funded categories, and documentation necessary for HCOS to apply for supplemental funding.
    5. If both the parent and SE RA agree that HCOS is a good fit for the family, and a teacher is available in the region, then the SE student is conditionally accepted.
    6. After the HCOS SE Office has received all supporting documentation from the parent and the SE administration is able to approve an SE category designation, then the student is accepted into the SE program.
    7. The SE teacher contacts the family to set up the first home visit and begin Individual Education Plan (IEP) collaboration and programming. There will be a minimum of three home visits throughout the school year.

    Program and Delivery

    The IEP is key to understanding individualized programming and delivery of support services to each SE designated student. Generally, the SE teacher directs the learning program through weekly communication with the parent, a minimum of three home visits a year to assess IEP goals and gather/observe samples and progress, weekly communication with education assistants (EAs), at least one progress report a year from third party professionals, and if the student is old enough, direct communication with the student. SE teachers may also connect with their students and SE families locally through HCOS Learning Group options.

    Student Discipline

    This page provides information on student behaviour expectations, and a standard course of action for students that struggle to meet the expectations. Also included on this page is HCOS' policy on our Code of Conduct and Procedural Fairness. 

    Student Behaviour Expectations and Course of Action

    Behaviour Expectations

    While we don’t anticipate any concerns, it is important to be share our expectations and to clarify course of action should an infraction occur. Parents should please go over this list with their children before the first class.  The expectations are, naturally, quite obvious and simple, but still worth discussing.

    Listening and Focusing:  

      1. When a teacher or other student is talking, all others should be listening.
      2. When you want to say something, raise your hand.
      3. Do your best to refocus quickly.  If you are chatting with a partner or group, if something is funny, if there is a larger discussion – enjoy and participate, but then refocus promptly.
      4. Enjoy your break time, but come back and refocus when called.

    Distractions:

      1. No playing with games or toys during class.
      2. Please leave all electronics off during class (unless needed for your class).
      3. Save eating and drinking for snack time.

    For students who ‘struggle’ to meet the expectations, this will be the standard course of action:

    1. For a once- off situation or infrequent situation, instructors will talk to the student.
    2. For a common re-occurrence, the student will be sent out of the room to talk with the coordinator.  If this happens the instructor or I will inform the parents and talk with them about it.
    3. If the situation continues then the Coordinator will make a time when those involved will all sit down and discuss the issue in order to make a plan for the way forward.  It may be that the parent is required to join their child in the class until the problem is changed or resolved.
    4. For a major occurrence, it will be as for #2.

    Code of conduct

    HCOS Learning Groups are committed to offering innovative, Christ-centered educational opportunities for home learners. As part of Heritage Christian Online School, we adhere to our school and societal mission, values, biblical attributes, policies, protocols and procedures.

    Communication
    1. We expect and promote open, honest communication, so that all students, teachers and families feel safe and valued at all HCOS Learning Group activities.
    2. Participants are asked to share with an HCOS teacher and or Learning Group Supervisor about any behaviour misconduct or bullying they’ve witnessed so that prompt intervention is possible.

    Behaviour
    3. Behaviour, tone, and our words are important. Please refer to the Biblical attributes within our learner profile as a guide to what we are working towards, including our expectations of speech and conduct.
    4. Participating students and families are expected to act respectfully and conduct themselves in an appropriate manner to all involved in the HCOS LG setting.

    Technology
    5. The purpose of Learning Group activities is to support and build community in a welcoming learning environment. Personal media devices should be left at home and not be in use during Learning Group activities unless permission is given by an instructor for the purpose of the activity.

    Where violations of the code of conduct take place, the safety and security of students will be the primary concern. While the goal is to re-integrate students where possible, a student may be asked to refrain from further participation until a meeting can be arranged for all parties to work together to address the situation and develop an appropriate action plan as needed.

    Procedural Fairness Policy

    These guidelines explain in general terms the principles which are the basis of “procedural fairness” and provide guidance as to how Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) can effectively address the requirements of “procedural fairness” when developing policies governing their day to day operations. HCOS should ensure it incorporates these principles and requirements when developing rules and procedures affecting students or staff.

    Requirements of Procedural Fairness
    1. If a decision-maker (e.g., a principal or authority) is intending to consider a matter which may affect a person’s rights, that person should be informed of the matter;
    2. The person should be given a reasonable opportunity to make oral or written submissions to the decision-maker on the matter being considered;
    3. The person is entitled to know and answer the case against them, that is to say, be informed of and be given the opportunity to respond to all information submitted which might influence a decision, prior to the decision being made;
    4. The person should be told the reasons for the decision;
    5. The decision-maker should act in a manner which is unbiased, fair and open-minded.
    Procedural Fairness and Students

    Basic elements of procedural fairness when dealing with student discipline include:

    1. Students need to be treated with respect and dignity and to know what is expected of them. HCOS should enact codes of conduct and rules that are clear and well communicated
    2. In accordance with school policy, a student who is accused of breaching a rule should be notified of that of which he/she is accused, with the essential facts of what he/she is alleged to have done.  
    3. [NOTE: In more serious cases, notification should also be given to a student’s parents.]
    4. An accused student should be given an opportunity to tell his/her side of the story. The right to be heard is a fundamental element of procedural fairness. Where the stakes are minor, this can be satisfied by a director or teacher asking the student to explain her/his actions. More serious matters require more formal investigation and documentation.
    5. The student and parent should be informed of any appeal or review procedure in accordance with school policy. Some form of appeal, e.g., to the principal, superintendent, principal’s or board’s discipline or appeal committee, or authority/school board, should be provided for in school policy, depending on the severity of the discipline.
    6. There should be an assurance of no retribution for pursuing an appeal or review

     

    Student Records Requirements and Best Practices Policy

    Note: For the purpose of this policy, the lead administrator in Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) is the Academic Head of School and/or Business Head of School

    HCOS is committed to ensuring that student records are handled in accordance with all legal requirements.

    The purpose of this document is to define policy and to determine procedures for the collection of student information and its storage, use, disclosure, transfer and protection.

    Policy Statements

    The following policy statements are provided to inform all parties who collect, store, use, disclose, transfer and protect student information.

    HCOS will:

    1.1 Ensure that the lead administrator is responsible for the establishment, security and maintenance of the Student Record and Student File (as defined in this policy) for each student registered in the school according to the procedures defined in this policy.

    1.2 Only collect, use or disclose personal information with the consent of the individual student or legal guardian, unless otherwise authorized under PIPA.  

    1.3 On or before collecting personal information, disclose to the individual student verbally or in writing the purposes for the collection of personal information.

    1.4 Only collect, use or disclose personal information for purposes that a reasonable person would consider appropriate in the circumstances and that fulfill the purposes disclosed by the school or are otherwise permitted under PIPA.

    1.5 Secure Student Records and Student Files with access within the school authority restricted to those individuals who, by the nature of their work, are required to have access to the information.

    1.6 Provide access to personal information about an individual student to the individual student (if capable of exercising PIPA rights), and to a parent or legal guardian of the individual student during school hours and under the supervision of the lead administrator or designate.

    1.8 Inform parents that concerns, complaints and questions about personal information handling policies and practices of the school authority may be directed to the school’s Privacy Officer by calling the school office.

    2. Definitions and Student Record Components
    2.1 Elements of the Student Record
    1. The Permanent Student Record (PSR), as defined in the Students Records Order (I 1/07):
      • Form 1704, PSB 048 (revised 1997) completed according to the Permanent Student Record Instructions that are effective at the time of completion; and
      • Student Progress Reports for the two most recent years or an official transcript of grades;
    2. All documents listed as inclusions on Form 1704 (see 2.2 below);
    3. Form A, verifying the information about the student’s parent or guardian in respect of students eligible for funding (see Appendix I);
    4. A copy of the student’s current Student Learning Plan, if any; and
    5. A copy of the student’s current Individual Education Plan (IEP), if any.
     2.2 Permanent Student Record (Form 1704) Inclusions

    The following inclusions must be listed on Form 1704, including document date, title and expiry date or date rescinded (if applicable), and copies of the documents listed must be filed with the PSR:

    1. Health Services information as indicated by the medical alert checkbox, such as diabetes, epilepsy, anaphylaxis producing allergies, and any other condition which may require emergency care;
    2. Court orders as indicated by the legal alert checkbox;
    3. Other legal documents, e.g. name change or immigration document;
    4. Support services information (e.g. psychometric testing, speech and hearing tests, adjudication requirements for completing assessment activities)
    5. Current IEP and/or Case Management Plan (CMP) where applicable; and
    6. Notification of a student being home schooled.

    The following inclusions may be listed on PSR Form 1704, including document date, title and expiry date or date rescinded (if applicable) and if listed, copies of the documents must be filed with the PSR:

    1. Records of information which an educator deems relevant and important to the educational program of the student;
    2. Award information; and
    3. Standardized test scores (if deemed relevant and important to the educational program of the student).

    If the above optional inclusions are NOT listed on PSR Form 1704, then they may be included in the Student File (see section 2.3, viii below).

    2.3 Student File

    Additional items must (see i below) or may (see ii – viii below) be included in the school’s student records as part of the Student File. These items include:

    1. Student eligibility information (required):
      • Legal name of child – verify the original and file a photocopy or scanned copy of birth certificate or similar legitimate identification document;
      • Official name(s) of parent(s) or guardian(s) with home and work contact information; and
      • Verification that parent/guardian is legally admitted to Canada and a resident of BC (see Appendix I, Form A, used to collect this information);
    2. Care Card number;
    3. Emergency contact numbers;
    4. Doctor’s name and contact information;
    5. Previous Student Progress Reports (other than the two most recent years required in the PSR)
    6. Serious discipline reports (e.g. copies of letters to parents/guardians regarding discipline matters and corrective actions taken);
    7. Reports of important meetings/discussions relating to the student; and
    8. Standardized test scores, records of information which an educator deems relevant and important to the educational program of the student, and award information IF NOT listed as inclusions on the PSR (see section 2.2 above).
    2.4 Sensitive Student Information

    This may include information which by its nature requires that school staff observe a high level of confidentiality. Examples include:

    1. Psychiatric reports;
    2. Family assessments;
    3. Referrals to or reports from school arranged counselling services; or
    4. Record of a school-initiated report of alleged sexual or physical abuse made to a child protection social worker under section 14 of the Child, Family and Community Service Act.
    Procedures

     3.1 The lead administrator or designate will be responsible for:

    1. Updating the PSR Form 1704 as information changes and the student progresses through the system;
    2. Ensuring that electronic copies of documents are stored on a server in a physically secure location. If information is accessed through the Internet, an encrypted connection (https://) must be established before authenticating. Access is restricted to those employees (such as designated records clerks, administration, teachers, and counsellors) who, by the nature of their work, are required to have access; and
    3. Ensuring that the school authority takes necessary precautions to safeguard against deprecated or obsolete forms of storage. The electronic storage of PSRs and other personal information requires the school authority to have an adequate backup plan and recovery strategy for potential hardware failure and database corruption.

    3.2 Student Record and Student File Retention:

    1. Student Records – Active Students
      • Original Student Records are locked in cabinets. All student records are scanned and digitized with back-ups stored off site. Access is restricted to those employees (such as designated records clerks, administrators, teachers, and counsellors) who, by the nature of their work, are required to have access.
      • The school authority protects personal information from unauthorized access, collection, use, disclosure, copying, modification, or disposal, or similar risks.
        Procedures for such protection are outlined in sections 5 and 6 below.
      • The lead administrator or designate will regularly review Student Records to ensure that the information is current and complies with legal requirements. Required inclusions must be listed on the PSR – see section 2.2 above.
    2. Student Records – Inactive Students
      • Unless another school requests a Student Record (see section 6 below), the school authority archives Student Records for 55 years after a student has withdrawn and not enrolled in another K-12 school, or graduated from the school.
      • The archived Student Records are stored digitally and in a manner that ensures their preservation from calamity (fire, flood, etc.) Access is limited to the lead administrator or designate.
      • The designated records clerk keeps a record of Student Records that are destroyed (shredded) after 55 years.
    3. Student Files – Active Students
      • Student Files are locked in cabinets in each school. Access is restricted to those employees (such as designated records clerks, administrators, teachers, and counsellors) who, by the nature of their work, are required to have access.
      • The school authority protects personal information from unauthorized access, collection, use, disclosure, copying, modification, or disposal, or similar risks.
        Procedures for such protection are outlined in sections 5 and 6 below.
      • The lead administrator or designate will regularly review Student Files to ensure that the information is relevant and important to the educational program of the student.
    4. Student Files – Inactive Students
      • The school authority archives Student Records for 55 years after the student has withdrawn and not enrolled in another K-12 school, or graduated from the school.
      • The archived Student Records are stored digitally and securely and in a manner that ensures their preservation from calamity (fire, flood, etc.) Access is limited to the administration or designate.
      • The lead administrator or designate is responsible for determining the relevancy of the contents in Student Records before being archived.
    3.3 Currency of Student Records

    Student eligibility information (see Appendix I) will be updated during student registration each year.

    As stated above, the lead administrator or designate will regularly review Student Records and Student Files to ensure that the information is current and complies with legal requirements.

    3.4 Security of Student Information Off Campus

    The lead administrator is responsible for ensuring that personal information taken off campus is safely stored and that personal information is protected.

    3.5 Handling of Sensitive Student Information

    Access to Sensitive Student Information is restricted to the lead administrator or a person or persons authorized by the lead administrator to access such information defined in section 2.4 of this policy.

    The lead administrator or designate will obtain parental consent (written, dated and signed) for the collection, use and disclosure of Sensitive Student Information, including psychiatric reports and family assessments, and will store these as highly confidential documents with restricted access.

    Sensitive Student Information will only be disclosed or transferred in accordance with the law.

    The lead administrator is responsible for ensuring that school initiated reports under section 14 of the Child, Family and Community Service Act are retained only for the purpose of child protection proceedings and that information is not disclosed to third parties or transferred to other schools. Such reports are strictly confidential and should only be stored where the lead administrator or designate can access them.

    4. Use of Student Personal Information

    The school authority may use an individual student’s personal information for the following purposes, assuming that the school has disclosed such purposes to the individual student verbally or in writing on or before collecting the personal information:

    4.1 To communicate with the student and/or the student’s parent or legal guardian, to process a student’s application, and to provide a student with the educational services and co-curricular programs provided by the school authority.
    4.2 To enable the authority to operate its administrative function, including payment of fees and maintenance of ancillary school programs such as parent voluntary groups and fundraising activities.
    4.3 To provide specialized services in areas of health, psychological or legal support, or as adjunct information in delivering educational services that are in the best interests of the student.

    5. Access to and Disclosure of Student Records

    1. A student (capable of exercising PIPA rights) and a parent/legal guardian of a student is permitted (unless restricted by a court order) to:

    An entitled person may access and verify personal information in the Student Record and Student File pertaining to the particular student with appropriate notice to the school administration. Access will be provided during school hours.

    2. Access to a Student Record or Student File will only be granted, upon assurance of confidentiality (with consent), to professionals who are planning for or delivering education, health, social or other support services to that student. Consent will be obtained in writing, listing the name and date of birth of the student, the name and signature of the parent/guardian, and the date of the request.

    3. When applicable, graduating students will be provided with interim and/or final transcripts for Grades 10, 11 and 12 courses when graduating, and upon future request of the graduate. 
    Copies will be mailed directly to institutions of higher learning or as requested by the graduate. The school authority reserves the right to assess a reasonable fee for transcript requests.

    4. In the case of a request for personal student information from separated or divorced parents, the school authority will be guided by the legal custody agreement, a copy of which should be provided to the lead administrator. In cases where the lead administrator is unsure if the non-custodial parent is entitled to access personal student information, the school’s legal counsel will be consulted for a recommendation.

    6. Transfer of Student Records
    1. On receipt of a request for student records from a school, a Board of Education, or an independent school authority from within British Columbia where the student is (or will be) enrolled, the school authority will transfer that student’s PSR (including declared inclusions), the current Student Learning Plan (if any), and the current IEP (if any) to the requesting institution. The school authority will retain a copy of the PSR, indicating the school where the records have been sent and the date of the student record transfer.
    2. If the requesting institution is outside British Columbia, a photocopy of the PSR will be sent (including declared inclusions), along with the current Student Learning Plan (if any), and the current IEP (if any).
    3. Requests for a student’s record from a public school require that the public school administration provide a copy of the PSR (including declared inclusions) and current Student Learning Plan (if applicable) and IEP (if applicable) to the independent school authority. The original PSR must be retained by the public school.
    4. The school authority will only transfer sensitive, confidential information (e.g. psychiatric 10 assessments) after dated and signed parent/guardian consent has been obtained.
    5. The school authority will not transfer a record of a Section 14 Child, Family and Community Service Act report of alleged sexual or physical abuse made to a child protection social worker.
    6. A summary of a former student’s school progress may be provided to prospective employers, at the written request of a former student. The school authority reserves the right to assess a fee for this service.
    7. A Student Record will be reviewed when a student transfers. The lead administrator will ensure that the documents listed as inclusions are still required inclusions (eg. not expired or rescinded) or still deemed to be relevant and important to the educational program of the student. Expired, rescinded, or irrelevant inclusions will be removed from the Student Record and the documents themselves will be shredded.
    List of Appendices
    1. Appendix 1: Form A – Status of Parent/Guardian (Admission to Canada and Residency)
    2. Appendix 2: Links to information on Student Record legislation:
    3. Appendix 3: Links to Student Record Policy:
      Student Records – Requirements and Best Practice Guidelines for Independent Schools, June 2012
    4. Appendix 4: Link to the Child, Family and Community Service Act

    Student Transportation Policy

    Best practice is for parents to provide transportation and/ or to arrange on their own as needed. In the rare instance that Coordinators arrange for transportation of other students, please consult the LG RA to review waiver needs, additional business insurance, and liability requirements.

    Requirements for Volunteer Parent Drivers:

    Copies of all drivers licenses and drivers auto insurance need to be kept on file.  For Learning Groups, please forward a copy of the insurance and Drivers’ Abstract to the LG Administrative Assistant for our records (altogether as a set).

    Teachers, if you are hoping to drive for an event, please contact your LGRA for further details and requirements.

    Teacher Education Delivery and Services Evaluation Policy

    New teachers will have their Education Delivery & Services evaluated as they near the end of their first year of teaching with Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS). This evaluation will be comprised of three parts: Teacher self-reflection, administration evaluation, and (if applicable) client observations. 

    Teacher evaluations take place annually, on a first year, fifth year, and tenth year basis.

    These components will be summarized by the Divisional Directors and will be presented to the teacher (and, where applicable, the Regional Administrator).

    The education delivery and services of a teacher may be evaluated at the administration’s discretion. If concerns arise regarding the education delivery of a teacher, then that teacher will be informed in writing that they their services will be evaluated that school year. Teachers may also request that their education delivery and services be evaluated.

    Tobacco and Vapes Use Policy

    Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) endeavors to see one’s physical, psychological, and spiritual well-being be as healthy as possible. Therefore, students, staff (both paid and volunteer) are not permitted the use of any form of tobacco and tobacco-like products (e-cigs, vapes, etc.) at any HCOS-sponsored event.

    HCOS recognizes that the use of tobacco and vapour products are a detrimental lifestyle choice for students, employees, and visitors. The school acknowledges its legal obligations to act in accordance with Section 2.2 of the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Act. Lastly, HCOS will accept the responsibility inherent in education of providing positive role models and best practices and will promote a healthy learning and working environment.

    Tobacco Use Prohibition
    1. No person is permitted to smoke, use, or hold any tobacco or vapour product at any school related function, in or on any building or land, owned, leased or rented by the school.
    2. No school student is permitted to smoke, use, or hold any tobacco or vapour product at any school sponsored or school related events.
    3. All persons who are not school students will be requested not to smoke, or use any tobacco or vapour products in the presence of school students at school sponsored or school related events.
    Enforcement
    1. Students engaging in the prohibited behavior will be subject to the stipulations of the student discipline policy.
    2. School employees engaging in the prohibited behavior will be subject to the stipulations of the employment agreement regarding employee code of conduct violations.
    3. All other persons will be asked to cease their use of a tobacco product or to leave the school event.
    Education
    1. HCOS will include education about the harmful effects of tobacco and vapour use at appropriate grade levels in its educational program.
    2. HCOS will communicate that it is a tobacco and vapour free institution through its usual communication modes to students, parents, employees, and visitors.

    Work Resubmission and Assignment Grading Policy

    Heritage Christian Online School (HCOS) and BC Online School (BCOS) students are permitted to resubmit work.

    In some cases, students may be permitted to resubmit work. It is at the teacher’s professional discretion whether or not a student may resubmit an assignment or rewrite a test. Below are guidelines only for teachers to use.

    1. Failure due to poor quality of work. Students will not be allowed to resubmit but have the ability to repeat the unit until competency has been demonstrated.
    2. Failure due to late submission. Students will not be permitted unless it causes the student to fail the unit.
    3. Low to Medium level plagiarism offence. Students will be required to resubmit an assignment using properly sourced documentation and referencing.
    4. Failure to due health related reasonings. Students will be allowed to resubmit an assignment. A medical note may be requested.

    Each category is treated differently and at the discretion of the course teacher. To resubmit an assignment the student must request written permission from their teacher via email. Once granted students are given only one opportunity to redo an assignment. The re-submission grade will be recorded in place of the original assignment mark. Any re-submission must be done within 14 days in order for the grading to be changed.

    Provincial Letter Grades Order

    BC Ministry of Education Governance and Legislation Branch E-49 September 15, 2015
    Authority: School Act, sections 79 (3), and 85(2) (j) and 168 (2) (b)

    {Ministerial Order 192/94 (M192/94) Effective September 1, 1994
    Repeals M18/90 and M148/89  
    Amended by M394/94 Effective November 28, 1994
    Amended by M208/95 Effective September 1, 1995
    Amended by M166/96 Effective April 17, 1996
    Amended by M330/97 Effective September 25, 1997
    Amended by M281/98 Effective August 12, 1998
    Amended by M32/04 Effective February 18, 2004
    Amended by M33/04 Effective February 18, 2004
    Amended by M321/04 Effective September 1, 2004
    Amended by M382/04 Effective November 1, 2004
    Amended by M171/05 Effective July 28, 2005
    Amended by M226/06 Effective September 2, 2007
    Amended by M199/11 Effective July 21, 2011

    Orders of the Minister of Education

    Interpretation
    1. The letter grades and their meaning in this order are set out for use in student progress reports for grades 4 through 12 in accordance with Ministerial Order 191/94, the Student Progress Report Order.
    2. In this order,
    Provincial Letter Grades Order

    BC Ministry of Education Governance and Legislation Branch E-50 September 15, 2015

    Letter grades
    Letter grades are as follows for:

    (a) term reports:

    A    =    The student demonstrates excellent or outstanding performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    B    =    The student demonstrates very good performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C+  =    The student demonstrates good performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C    =    The student demonstrates satisfactory performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C-   =    The student demonstrates minimally acceptable performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    I      =    (In Progress or Incomplete) The student, for a variety of reasons, is not demonstrating minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected curricular competencies. An "I" letter grade may only be assigned in accordance with section 3.

    F     =    (Failing) The student has not demonstrated, or is not demonstrating, the minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade. The letter grade "F" may only be assigned if an "I" (In Progress) letter grade has been previously assigned for that course or subject and grade.

    W    =    (Withdrawal) According to the policy of the board, and upon request of the parent of the student or, when appropriate, the student, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may grant permission to a student to withdraw from a course or subject.

    (b) final reports:

    A     =   The student demonstrates excellent or outstanding performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    B     =   The student demonstrates very good performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C+   =   The student demonstrates good performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C     =   The student demonstrates satisfactory performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

    C-    =   The student demonstrates minimally acceptable performance in relation to expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade.

     I       =   (In Progress or Incomplete) The student, for a variety of reasons, is not demonstrating minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected curricular competencies. An "I" letter grade may only be assigned in accordance with section 3.

    F      =   (Failed) The student has not demonstrated the minimally acceptable performance in relation to the expected curricular competencies for the course or subject and grade. F (Failed) may only be used as a final letter grade if an "I" (In Progress) letter grade has been previously assigned or the "F" is assigned as a result of failing a provincially examinable course.

    W     =   (Withdrawal) According to the policy of the board, and upon request of the parent of the student or, when appropriate, the student, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may grant permission to a student to withdraw from a course or subject.

    SG    =  (Standing Granted) Although completion of normal requirements is not possible, a sufficient level of performance has been attained to warrant, consistent with the best interests of the student, the granting of standing for the course or subject and grade. Standing Granted may be used in cases of serious illness, hospitalization, late entry or early leaving, but may only be granted upon approval by the Academic Head of School. Standing Granted may not be used for a course with a Required Graduation Program Examination. Standing Granted may not be used for Graduation Transitions.

    TS    =   (Transfer Standing) May be granted by the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school on the basis of an examination of records from an institution other than a school as defined in the School Act. Alternatively, the principal, vice principal or director of instruction in charge of a school may assign a letter grade on the basis of an examination of those records.

    RM   =   (Requirement Met) The student has met the learning outcomes set out in the applicable educational program guide for Graduation Transitions, listed in the Ministerial Order 333/00, the Educational Program Guide Order. Requirement Met may only be used for Graduation Transitions. 
    [am. M394/94; am. M330/97; am M32/04; am M171/05; am M195/06, am. M226/07; am M199/11]

    Assignment of an "In Progress or Incomplete" Letter Grade
    1. An "I" (In Progress or Incomplete) may be assigned at any time during the school year and is not restricted to term and final reports.
    2. Where an "I" (In Progress or Incomplete) is assigned, the student and the parent of the student must be informed and have an opportunity to consult with the teacher on the plan of action specified in subsection (3).
    3. Where an "I" (In Progress or Incomplete) is assigned, teachers must be prepared to identify what the problem is and specify a plan of action that is intended to help students achieve the curricular competencies.
    4. An "I" (In Progress or Incomplete) may be communicated in a variety of ways including a written plan, verbally by telephone, or in a direct meeting involving teacher, parents and students.
    5. Where an "I" (In Progress or Incomplete) is assigned, the "I" letter grade must be converted to another letter grade:
      • when letter grades are recorded on the permanent student record card,
      • before submission to the ministry for inclusion on that student's transcript of grades, and
      • before a student's records are transferred to another school unless there is agreement between the principals of the two schools to defer the conversion of the "I" letter grade.
        [en. M394/94; am. M330/97; am. M33/04]
    Percentages for Courses

    Where the letter grades in Table 1 are used to indicate student performance in courses numbered 10, 11, or 12 for students to whom Ministerial Order 302/04, the Graduation Program Order, applies, percentages as set out opposite the letter grades in Table 1 must also be used in term and final student progress reports.

    Table 1

    A

    86 - 100

    B

    73 - 85

    C+

    67 - 72

    C

    60 - 66

    C-

    50 - 59

    F

    0 - 49

    [am. M394/94, am M321/04; am M199/11]

    Successful Completion of Courses Numbered 10, 11 or 12

    The successful completion of a course numbered 10, 11 or 12 requires a minimum of a C- grade.
    [am M321/04 ; am M199/11]

    REPEALED M330/97